10th Class English Current Affairs Question Bank

done Current Affairs

Question Bank
  • question_answer1)

    Direction: Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    A 2005 World Health Assembly resolution calls on WHO to intensify international collaboration in reducing public health problems caused by the harmful use of alcohol.
    The hazardous and harmful use of alcohol has now become one of the most important risks to health: it is the leading risk factor in developing countries with low mortality rates and ranks third in developed countries, according to the World Health Report 2002. While alcohol use is deeply embedded in many societies, recent years have seen changes in drinking patterns across the globe: rates of consumption, drinking to excess among the general population and heavy episodic drinking among young people are on the rise in many countries. Health problems associated with alcohol consumption have reached alarming levels, and alcohol use contributes to a wide range of diseases, health conditions and high-risk behaviors, from mental disorders and road traffic injuries, to liver diseases and unsafe sexual behavior.
    Through this WHA resolution, WHO's Secretariat is requested to address a number of areas related to the issue of harmful use of alcohol, including: gathering and sharing scientific information on alcohol consumption and related public health problems, preparing research and policy initiatives and recommendations for effective policies and interventions, providing support to Member States in monitoring alcohol-related harm and implementing effective strategies and promoting identification and management of alcohol-use disorders in primary health care. The World Health Assembly takes note that the word 'harmful' in this resolution refers only to the public health effects of alcohol use and does not intend to prejudice the religious beliefs or cultural norms of any Member State.
    BMW case: Delhi Court Rejects Bhasin's Bail Plea
    NEW DELHI: A Delhi court on Tuesday rejected the bail application of Utsav Bhasin, who was involved in the BMW hit-and-run case that took place on Thursday Bhasin has been booked under Section 304 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC)-culpable homicide not amounting to murder-and can be arrested anytime soon. Eighteen-year-old Utsav, son of a Delhi-based industrialist, was earlier arrested while trying to go to Chandigarh. However, he was later given bail. The family of the victims filed a case in the court demanding stricter action against Utsav. They alleged that the rich parents of Utsav will send him abroad now if he gets out on bail. Utsav stands accused of hitting two people on a motorbike, one of whom died after the incident.
    According to the World Health Report Q002, what is the main cause of health to risk which is used by the common man?
     

    A) Alcohol                        

    B) Drug      

    C) Cigarettes                     

    D) Coffee

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer2)

    Direction: Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    A 2005 World Health Assembly resolution calls on WHO to intensify international collaboration in reducing public health problems caused by the harmful use of alcohol.
    The hazardous and harmful use of alcohol has now become one of the most important risks to health: it is the leading risk factor in developing countries with low mortality rates and ranks third in developed countries, according to the World Health Report 2002. While alcohol use is deeply embedded in many societies, recent years have seen changes in drinking patterns across the globe: rates of consumption, drinking to excess among the general population and heavy episodic drinking among young people are on the rise in many countries. Health problems associated with alcohol consumption have reached alarming levels, and alcohol use contributes to a wide range of diseases, health conditions and high-risk behaviors, from mental disorders and road traffic injuries, to liver diseases and unsafe sexual behavior.
    Through this WHA resolution, WHO's Secretariat is requested to address a number of areas related to the issue of harmful use of alcohol, including: gathering and sharing scientific information on alcohol consumption and related public health problems, preparing research and policy initiatives and recommendations for effective policies and interventions, providing support to Member States in monitoring alcohol-related harm and implementing effective strategies and promoting identification and management of alcohol-use disorders in primary health care. The World Health Assembly takes note that the word 'harmful' in this resolution refers only to the public health effects of alcohol use and does not intend to prejudice the religious beliefs or cultural norms of any Member State.
    BMW case: Delhi Court Rejects Bhasin's Bail Plea
    NEW DELHI: A Delhi court on Tuesday rejected the bail application of Utsav Bhasin, who was involved in the BMW hit-and-run case that took place on Thursday Bhasin has been booked under Section 304 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC)-culpable homicide not amounting to murder-and can be arrested anytime soon. Eighteen-year-old Utsav, son of a Delhi-based industrialist, was earlier arrested while trying to go to Chandigarh. However, he was later given bail. The family of the victims filed a case in the court demanding stricter action against Utsav. They alleged that the rich parents of Utsav will send him abroad now if he gets out on bail. Utsav stands accused of hitting two people on a motorbike, one of whom died after the incident.
    In which age group alcohol consumption is becoming more popular?
     

    A) Old age                       

    B) Young age

    C) Childhood                    

    D) All of these

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer3)

    Direction: Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    A 2005 World Health Assembly resolution calls on WHO to intensify international collaboration in reducing public health problems caused by the harmful use of alcohol.
    The hazardous and harmful use of alcohol has now become one of the most important risks to health: it is the leading risk factor in developing countries with low mortality rates and ranks third in developed countries, according to the World Health Report 2002. While alcohol use is deeply embedded in many societies, recent years have seen changes in drinking patterns across the globe: rates of consumption, drinking to excess among the general population and heavy episodic drinking among young people are on the rise in many countries. Health problems associated with alcohol consumption have reached alarming levels, and alcohol use contributes to a wide range of diseases, health conditions and high-risk behaviors, from mental disorders and road traffic injuries, to liver diseases and unsafe sexual behavior.
    Through this WHA resolution, WHO's Secretariat is requested to address a number of areas related to the issue of harmful use of alcohol, including: gathering and sharing scientific information on alcohol consumption and related public health problems, preparing research and policy initiatives and recommendations for effective policies and interventions, providing support to Member States in monitoring alcohol-related harm and implementing effective strategies and promoting identification and management of alcohol-use disorders in primary health care. The World Health Assembly takes note that the word 'harmful' in this resolution refers only to the public health effects of alcohol use and does not intend to prejudice the religious beliefs or cultural norms of any Member State.
    BMW case: Delhi Court Rejects Bhasin's Bail Plea
    NEW DELHI: A Delhi court on Tuesday rejected the bail application of Utsav Bhasin, who was involved in the BMW hit-and-run case that took place on Thursday Bhasin has been booked under Section 304 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC)-culpable homicide not amounting to murder-and can be arrested anytime soon. Eighteen-year-old Utsav, son of a Delhi-based industrialist, was earlier arrested while trying to go to Chandigarh. However, he was later given bail. The family of the victims filed a case in the court demanding stricter action against Utsav. They alleged that the rich parents of Utsav will send him abroad now if he gets out on bail. Utsav stands accused of hitting two people on a motorbike, one of whom died after the incident.
    Here WHA stands for:
     

    A) World Hot Ares                

    B) World Health Arenas

    C) World Heath Ares              

    D) World Health Assembly

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer4)

    Direction: Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    A 2005 World Health Assembly resolution calls on WHO to intensify international collaboration in reducing public health problems caused by the harmful use of alcohol.
    The hazardous and harmful use of alcohol has now become one of the most important risks to health: it is the leading risk factor in developing countries with low mortality rates and ranks third in developed countries, according to the World Health Report 2002. While alcohol use is deeply embedded in many societies, recent years have seen changes in drinking patterns across the globe: rates of consumption, drinking to excess among the general population and heavy episodic drinking among young people are on the rise in many countries. Health problems associated with alcohol consumption have reached alarming levels, and alcohol use contributes to a wide range of diseases, health conditions and high-risk behaviors, from mental disorders and road traffic injuries, to liver diseases and unsafe sexual behavior.
    Through this WHA resolution, WHO's Secretariat is requested to address a number of areas related to the issue of harmful use of alcohol, including: gathering and sharing scientific information on alcohol consumption and related public health problems, preparing research and policy initiatives and recommendations for effective policies and interventions, providing support to Member States in monitoring alcohol-related harm and implementing effective strategies and promoting identification and management of alcohol-use disorders in primary health care. The World Health Assembly takes note that the word 'harmful' in this resolution refers only to the public health effects of alcohol use and does not intend to prejudice the religious beliefs or cultural norms of any Member State.
    BMW case: Delhi Court Rejects Bhasin's Bail Plea
    NEW DELHI: A Delhi court on Tuesday rejected the bail application of Utsav Bhasin, who was involved in the BMW hit-and-run case that took place on Thursday Bhasin has been booked under Section 304 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC)-culpable homicide not amounting to murder-and can be arrested anytime soon. Eighteen-year-old Utsav, son of a Delhi-based industrialist, was earlier arrested while trying to go to Chandigarh. However, he was later given bail. The family of the victims filed a case in the court demanding stricter action against Utsav. They alleged that the rich parents of Utsav will send him abroad now if he gets out on bail. Utsav stands accused of hitting two people on a motorbike, one of whom died after the incident.
    The WHA uses which word not intended to prejudice an religious beliefs or cultural norms of any member state?
     

    A) Harmful     

    B) Harmless  

    C) Warful                         

    D) Warnful         

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer5)

    The communal violence and retaliation by security forces claiming two more lives in Kandhmal in Orissa on Saturday, and Bajrang Dal-led attacks on Christians in Davanagere and Chikmagalur in Karnataka, no longer appear to be isolated incidents. Conversion related violence is on the rise and tantamount to opening up of yet another front apart from the ones that jolt us out of our revery now and then: Islamist terrorism and Maoist extremism.
    The attacks on Christians are being sought to be justified on the ground that people are being forcibly converted from Hinduism or tribalism to Christianity.
    But on closer scrutiny, it appears the issue isn't merely of conversion. In Kandhmal, for instance, it's the increasing prosperity of the Dalit Panas after they converted to Christianity that seems to have become a trigger for violence against them.
    In times of blind hatred, there is no independent verification of the charge levelled by the majority Kandha Tribals against the Dalit Panas:  that they claim Hinduism as their religion in certificates for job benefits as SCs but practice Christianity for a jump in their social profile. Orissa has the highest percentage of Hindu population of all the states, almost 95%.
    While Hindu numbers have decreased marginally over the last three decades, there has been a corresponding increase in Christian population. This possibly points at the cause-but not the justification-for the attacks against Orissa's Christians. In West Bengal's Nadia district, the last reported instance of violence against Christians was on Christmas 2002, when a priest and 14 others were injured after a group of about 50 armed men attacked the church during the special midnight mass.
    They threatened about 1,000 worshippers with dire consequence if they didn't immediately disperse. Says George Pattery, Head of Jesuits of Kolkata, "Sitting in West Bengal, we can't imagine the struggle that missionaries are going through in Orissa. They are being targeted because they have been able to bring a change in the lives of the poorest of the poor. However, as always we will continue with our work." In Karnataka, where a couple of days before the Davanagere prayer hall was torched, the local administration locked up two churches in the town.
    Two students of Bible College too were attacked. Says former Bangalore city Police Chief and BJP MP, H. T. Sangliana, who voted with the UPA on the July 22 trust vote, "The impression among people is that the attacks on Christians have increased since the BJP government came to power in the state. The freedom of religion has been violated." He refutes the charge of conversion against the missionaries and says, "No one has produced any evidence." In Chhattisgarh, a relatively unknown group of fundamentalists, Dharma Sena, has been periodically attacking Christian congregations and prayer meetings.
    On Christmas Eve in 2007, Pastor James and 10 other Christians were beaten up by "Dharma Sena" lumpens. Then, only last week, four Catholic nuns were forced to get off a train at Durg Railway Station along with four infants by Dharma Sena activists who claimed the children were Hindu and were being taken for religious conversion. It later came to light that the babies were willingly handed over to the nuns of Missionaries of Charity by unwed mothers. Religious conversion is a social issue needing address by community leaders through dialogue. Its degeneration into violence is a reflection on the shrinking liberal space where all differences are sought to be sorted out through physical intimidation and, worse, liquidation.
    Orissa has the highest percentage of Hindu population of all the states, almost_____.
     

    A) 10%                            

    B) 95%      

    C) 50%                            

    D) 55%

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer6)

    The communal violence and retaliation by security forces claiming two more lives in Kandhmal in Orissa on Saturday, and Bajrang Dal-led attacks on Christians in Davanagere and Chikmagalur in Karnataka, no longer appear to be isolated incidents. Conversion related violence is on the rise and tantamount to opening up of yet another front apart from the ones that jolt us out of our revery now and then: Islamist terrorism and Maoist extremism.
    The attacks on Christians are being sought to be justified on the ground that people are being forcibly converted from Hinduism or tribalism to Christianity.
    But on closer scrutiny, it appears the issue isn't merely of conversion. In Kandhmal, for instance, it's the increasing prosperity of the Dalit Panas after they converted to Christianity that seems to have become a trigger for violence against them.
    In times of blind hatred, there is no independent verification of the charge levelled by the majority Kandha Tribals against the Dalit Panas:  that they claim Hinduism as their religion in certificates for job benefits as SCs but practice Christianity for a jump in their social profile. Orissa has the highest percentage of Hindu population of all the states, almost 95%.
    While Hindu numbers have decreased marginally over the last three decades, there has been a corresponding increase in Christian population. This possibly points at the cause-but not the justification-for the attacks against Orissa's Christians. In West Bengal's Nadia district, the last reported instance of violence against Christians was on Christmas 2002, when a priest and 14 others were injured after a group of about 50 armed men attacked the church during the special midnight mass.
    They threatened about 1,000 worshippers with dire consequence if they didn't immediately disperse. Says George Pattery, Head of Jesuits of Kolkata, "Sitting in West Bengal, we can't imagine the struggle that missionaries are going through in Orissa. They are being targeted because they have been able to bring a change in the lives of the poorest of the poor. However, as always we will continue with our work." In Karnataka, where a couple of days before the Davanagere prayer hall was torched, the local administration locked up two churches in the town.
    Two students of Bible College too were attacked. Says former Bangalore city Police Chief and BJP MP, H. T. Sangliana, who voted with the UPA on the July 22 trust vote, "The impression among people is that the attacks on Christians have increased since the BJP government came to power in the state. The freedom of religion has been violated." He refutes the charge of conversion against the missionaries and says, "No one has produced any evidence." In Chhattisgarh, a relatively unknown group of fundamentalists, Dharma Sena, has been periodically attacking Christian congregations and prayer meetings.
    On Christmas Eve in 2007, Pastor James and 10 other Christians were beaten up by "Dharma Sena" lumpens. Then, only last week, four Catholic nuns were forced to get off a train at Durg Railway Station along with four infants by Dharma Sena activists who claimed the children were Hindu and were being taken for religious conversion. It later came to light that the babies were willingly handed over to the nuns of Missionaries of Charity by unwed mothers. Religious conversion is a social issue needing address by community leaders through dialogue. Its degeneration into violence is a reflection on the shrinking liberal space where all differences are sought to be sorted out through physical intimidation and, worse, liquidation.
    A violence against Christians broke out in Nandia District, in which a priest and 14 other men died. What was the name of the state?
     

    A) Bengluru                      

    B) Orissa

    C) Karnataka                    

    D) West Bengal

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer7)

    The communal violence and retaliation by security forces claiming two more lives in Kandhmal in Orissa on Saturday, and Bajrang Dal-led attacks on Christians in Davanagere and Chikmagalur in Karnataka, no longer appear to be isolated incidents. Conversion related violence is on the rise and tantamount to opening up of yet another front apart from the ones that jolt us out of our revery now and then: Islamist terrorism and Maoist extremism.
    The attacks on Christians are being sought to be justified on the ground that people are being forcibly converted from Hinduism or tribalism to Christianity.
    But on closer scrutiny, it appears the issue isn't merely of conversion. In Kandhmal, for instance, it's the increasing prosperity of the Dalit Panas after they converted to Christianity that seems to have become a trigger for violence against them.
    In times of blind hatred, there is no independent verification of the charge levelled by the majority Kandha Tribals against the Dalit Panas:  that they claim Hinduism as their religion in certificates for job benefits as SCs but practice Christianity for a jump in their social profile. Orissa has the highest percentage of Hindu population of all the states, almost 95%.
    While Hindu numbers have decreased marginally over the last three decades, there has been a corresponding increase in Christian population. This possibly points at the cause-but not the justification-for the attacks against Orissa's Christians. In West Bengal's Nadia district, the last reported instance of violence against Christians was on Christmas 2002, when a priest and 14 others were injured after a group of about 50 armed men attacked the church during the special midnight mass.
    They threatened about 1,000 worshippers with dire consequence if they didn't immediately disperse. Says George Pattery, Head of Jesuits of Kolkata, "Sitting in West Bengal, we can't imagine the struggle that missionaries are going through in Orissa. They are being targeted because they have been able to bring a change in the lives of the poorest of the poor. However, as always we will continue with our work." In Karnataka, where a couple of days before the Davanagere prayer hall was torched, the local administration locked up two churches in the town.
    Two students of Bible College too were attacked. Says former Bangalore city Police Chief and BJP MP, H. T. Sangliana, who voted with the UPA on the July 22 trust vote, "The impression among people is that the attacks on Christians have increased since the BJP government came to power in the state. The freedom of religion has been violated." He refutes the charge of conversion against the missionaries and says, "No one has produced any evidence." In Chhattisgarh, a relatively unknown group of fundamentalists, Dharma Sena, has been periodically attacking Christian congregations and prayer meetings.
    On Christmas Eve in 2007, Pastor James and 10 other Christians were beaten up by "Dharma Sena" lumpens. Then, only last week, four Catholic nuns were forced to get off a train at Durg Railway Station along with four infants by Dharma Sena activists who claimed the children were Hindu and were being taken for religious conversion. It later came to light that the babies were willingly handed over to the nuns of Missionaries of Charity by unwed mothers. Religious conversion is a social issue needing address by community leaders through dialogue. Its degeneration into violence is a reflection on the shrinking liberal space where all differences are sought to be sorted out through physical intimidation and, worse, liquidation.
    Attack on Christians increased, it is believed, by the people in the tenure of:
     

    A) Congress                      

    B) BJP       

    C) BSP                            

    D) NDA

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer8)

    The communal violence and retaliation by security forces claiming two more lives in Kandhmal in Orissa on Saturday, and Bajrang Dal-led attacks on Christians in Davanagere and Chikmagalur in Karnataka, no longer appear to be isolated incidents. Conversion related violence is on the rise and tantamount to opening up of yet another front apart from the ones that jolt us out of our revery now and then: Islamist terrorism and Maoist extremism.
    The attacks on Christians are being sought to be justified on the ground that people are being forcibly converted from Hinduism or tribalism to Christianity.
    But on closer scrutiny, it appears the issue isn't merely of conversion. In Kandhmal, for instance, it's the increasing prosperity of the Dalit Panas after they converted to Christianity that seems to have become a trigger for violence against them.
    In times of blind hatred, there is no independent verification of the charge levelled by the majority Kandha Tribals against the Dalit Panas:  that they claim Hinduism as their religion in certificates for job benefits as SCs but practice Christianity for a jump in their social profile. Orissa has the highest percentage of Hindu population of all the states, almost 95%.
    While Hindu numbers have decreased marginally over the last three decades, there has been a corresponding increase in Christian population. This possibly points at the cause-but not the justification-for the attacks against Orissa's Christians. In West Bengal's Nadia district, the last reported instance of violence against Christians was on Christmas 2002, when a priest and 14 others were injured after a group of about 50 armed men attacked the church during the special midnight mass.
    They threatened about 1,000 worshippers with dire consequence if they didn't immediately disperse. Says George Pattery, Head of Jesuits of Kolkata, "Sitting in West Bengal, we can't imagine the struggle that missionaries are going through in Orissa. They are being targeted because they have been able to bring a change in the lives of the poorest of the poor. However, as always we will continue with our work." In Karnataka, where a couple of days before the Davanagere prayer hall was torched, the local administration locked up two churches in the town.
    Two students of Bible College too were attacked. Says former Bangalore city Police Chief and BJP MP, H. T. Sangliana, who voted with the UPA on the July 22 trust vote, "The impression among people is that the attacks on Christians have increased since the BJP government came to power in the state. The freedom of religion has been violated." He refutes the charge of conversion against the missionaries and says, "No one has produced any evidence." In Chhattisgarh, a relatively unknown group of fundamentalists, Dharma Sena, has been periodically attacking Christian congregations and prayer meetings.
    On Christmas Eve in 2007, Pastor James and 10 other Christians were beaten up by "Dharma Sena" lumpens. Then, only last week, four Catholic nuns were forced to get off a train at Durg Railway Station along with four infants by Dharma Sena activists who claimed the children were Hindu and were being taken for religious conversion. It later came to light that the babies were willingly handed over to the nuns of Missionaries of Charity by unwed mothers. Religious conversion is a social issue needing address by community leaders through dialogue. Its degeneration into violence is a reflection on the shrinking liberal space where all differences are sought to be sorted out through physical intimidation and, worse, liquidation.
    On Christmas Eve in 2007, Pastor James and 10 other Christians were beaten up by:
     

    A) Ram Sena                    

    B) Ravan Sena

    C) Dharma Sena                

    D) RSS

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer9)

    What is the future for schools? The 20th anniversary of the far-reaching 1988 Education Reform Act, which was commemorated this week, seems an appropriate moment for a pause for reflection on where we should be heading with schooling. The Act, which introduced the National Curriculum and its associated school tests in England and Wales, was a pivotal moment. Central Government took unprecedented powers to decide what and how children should learn.
    Ever since getting their hands on the levers of control, successive governments have never relaxed their grip. But do we still need a National Curriculum?
    And why are schools still based on a 19th century model when we are now several years into the 21st century? As it happens, these were also the questions aired at a gathering of education experts I attended recently in the unlikely setting of the North Tower of London's Tower Bridge. The event was part of Horizontal, it stands for 'Horizon Scanning: Technology and Learning', a futurology project funded by the Department for Children Schools and Families and organized by Professor Stephen Heppell.
    Bridge to the future
    The issues it sets out to address- what shape education should take in the future- are as relevant to England and Wales, and the rest of the UK, as they are to both advanced and developing nations around the world. There was a time when every country aspired to have a National Airline in much the same way as they felt the need for a National Curriculum. The setting was inspirational and apt. We were inside Tower Bridge, high above the River Thames at the heart of London, with road and river traffic teeming far below. It was inspirational because it offered new perspectives on familiar and traditional objects. It was apt because when Tower Bridge was designed it was an example of an innovative solution to a long-term problem: how to keep London's increasingly busy road traffic moving without disrupting a busy river port.
    The experts came from all over the world. They were educators and economists, teachers and administrators, bankers and entrepreneurs. Some inhabited the world of centralized, tax-funded government provision. Others belonged to the voluntary sector. Yet others were active in the for-profit world of private enterprise. Discussion focused around why schooling had failed to change radically when so many other spheres of life had been transformed.
    Globalization: Now most have accepted there is no need for a government-owned, nationally branded airline. Why then do we still feel the need for our own distinctive National Curriculum rather than taking a 'pick n mix' selection from the best bits of curricular around the world? As Professor Heppell noted, modern economies do not try to do everything anymore. There are just a handful of countries that continue with car-making, or try to excel at film-making. The rest import cars and films from those places acknowledged as world's best.
    So why don't we do the same in education. If a country, Finland for example, has found a schooling model that consistently leads the world, why don't we import it either wholesale or at least in parts? Or, more radically, if a private school chain from Sweden or the USA has developed an effective model why don't governments hire them rather than persisting with their own failing models? Is providing charitable donations of second-hand computers to schools in the developing world really the best way to stimulate education reform? Or should government offer contracts to the private sector to make investments in the country's educational infrastructure in return for a long-term payback as a more educated and prosperous nation starts to buy its products?
    These are, of course, controversial questions. They raise ethical issues. They rarely prompt easy answers. But it does seem right to be asking them.
    User-generated learning
    As Professor Heppell pointed out other sectors have been transformed by technological change. Take broadcasting, for example, two decades ago, or even less, it was nice and simple: the broadcasters made programmes for the audience. No one strayed much over the dividing line. Now not only do the established broadcasters appeal for, and broadcast, 'user-generated content', but they are losing out to the likes of YouTube where users provide their own material. Or, closer to the world of learning, look at what has happened with encyclopedias. Once families saved up to fill a whole shelf at home with several volumes, then these were condensed onto a single CD-ROM for a smaller price. Now it is all free online and- with Wikipedia -you can even add your own entries.
    So why has this not happened with schools? Why, despite the rhetoric about personalized learning, do we still have National Curricula and National Testing?
    Why, for that matter, are schoolrooms still much the same in terms of size, shape and focus as they were 150 years ago when mass education began in Britain and learning methods were so different?
    Political grip
    One answer to emerge from the event was that, unlike many industries, education is still firmly in the grip of governments. The consensus was that governments are generally not very good at innovation or risk-taking. Nor do they tend to take the long view (the sponsoring of this event by the DCSF being a notable exception) as they work to four or five year cycles. Where new technologies have been used they tend to reinforce existing teaching and learning methods rather than taking us off in new directions. The model for schooling still very often involves gathering large numbers of children together into a single building, dividing them into groups by age, and placing an adult with some textbooks in front of them.
    Yet the evidence around us shows that young people, and increasingly adults too, learn from their peers. If they want to find something out they go on the web, searching for a user group or search engine, rather than asking a nearby figure of authority. Of course, there are problems with this. You can get the wrong, or false, answers. You can fail to understand the information or its context. But shouldn't we take more note of how young people learn? When they get a new mobile phone or computer, they never read the manual. They learn by doing or by asking their peers in online communities. This may not work for all young people but it can be great for those who find conventional schooling unbearable. Take the 'Not School' initiative that has had great success with pupils who have been excluded from school. Instead of putting them all together in a special unit, it created a virtual school, where pupils learned from home, interacting over the Internet.
    So, 20 years on, is the Education Reform Act still the right approach? Or is it time we broke out of a 19th century model of the teacher at the front of each class, delivering a prescribed curriculum, and constrained by regular pencil and paper National Tests? I don't know the answers to these questions, but I'd be interested to hear yours. It's something to contemplate over the summer school holidays.
    Our schooling systems are based on which century when we are in 21st century?
     

    A) 10th century                 

    B) 19th century

    C) 20th century                 

    D) 21st century

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer10)

    What is the future for schools? The 20th anniversary of the far-reaching 1988 Education Reform Act, which was commemorated this week, seems an appropriate moment for a pause for reflection on where we should be heading with schooling. The Act, which introduced the National Curriculum and its associated school tests in England and Wales, was a pivotal moment. Central Government took unprecedented powers to decide what and how children should learn.
    Ever since getting their hands on the levers of control, successive governments have never relaxed their grip. But do we still need a National Curriculum?
    And why are schools still based on a 19th century model when we are now several years into the 21st century? As it happens, these were also the questions aired at a gathering of education experts I attended recently in the unlikely setting of the North Tower of London's Tower Bridge. The event was part of Horizontal, it stands for 'Horizon Scanning: Technology and Learning', a futurology project funded by the Department for Children Schools and Families and organized by Professor Stephen Heppell.
    Bridge to the future
    The issues it sets out to address- what shape education should take in the future- are as relevant to England and Wales, and the rest of the UK, as they are to both advanced and developing nations around the world. There was a time when every country aspired to have a National Airline in much the same way as they felt the need for a National Curriculum. The setting was inspirational and apt. We were inside Tower Bridge, high above the River Thames at the heart of London, with road and river traffic teeming far below. It was inspirational because it offered new perspectives on familiar and traditional objects. It was apt because when Tower Bridge was designed it was an example of an innovative solution to a long-term problem: how to keep London's increasingly busy road traffic moving without disrupting a busy river port.
    The experts came from all over the world. They were educators and economists, teachers and administrators, bankers and entrepreneurs. Some inhabited the world of centralized, tax-funded government provision. Others belonged to the voluntary sector. Yet others were active in the for-profit world of private enterprise. Discussion focused around why schooling had failed to change radically when so many other spheres of life had been transformed.
    Globalization: Now most have accepted there is no need for a government-owned, nationally branded airline. Why then do we still feel the need for our own distinctive National Curriculum rather than taking a 'pick n mix' selection from the best bits of curricular around the world? As Professor Heppell noted, modern economies do not try to do everything anymore. There are just a handful of countries that continue with car-making, or try to excel at film-making. The rest import cars and films from those places acknowledged as world's best.
    So why don't we do the same in education. If a country, Finland for example, has found a schooling model that consistently leads the world, why don't we import it either wholesale or at least in parts? Or, more radically, if a private school chain from Sweden or the USA has developed an effective model why don't governments hire them rather than persisting with their own failing models? Is providing charitable donations of second-hand computers to schools in the developing world really the best way to stimulate education reform? Or should government offer contracts to the private sector to make investments in the country's educational infrastructure in return for a long-term payback as a more educated and prosperous nation starts to buy its products?
    These are, of course, controversial questions. They raise ethical issues. They rarely prompt easy answers. But it does seem right to be asking them.
    User-generated learning
    As Professor Heppell pointed out other sectors have been transformed by technological change. Take broadcasting, for example, two decades ago, or even less, it was nice and simple: the broadcasters made programmes for the audience. No one strayed much over the dividing line. Now not only do the established broadcasters appeal for, and broadcast, 'user-generated content', but they are losing out to the likes of YouTube where users provide their own material. Or, closer to the world of learning, look at what has happened with encyclopedias. Once families saved up to fill a whole shelf at home with several volumes, then these were condensed onto a single CD-ROM for a smaller price. Now it is all free online and- with Wikipedia -you can even add your own entries.
    So why has this not happened with schools? Why, despite the rhetoric about personalized learning, do we still have National Curricula and National Testing?
    Why, for that matter, are schoolrooms still much the same in terms of size, shape and focus as they were 150 years ago when mass education began in Britain and learning methods were so different?
    Political grip
    One answer to emerge from the event was that, unlike many industries, education is still firmly in the grip of governments. The consensus was that governments are generally not very good at innovation or risk-taking. Nor do they tend to take the long view (the sponsoring of this event by the DCSF being a notable exception) as they work to four or five year cycles. Where new technologies have been used they tend to reinforce existing teaching and learning methods rather than taking us off in new directions. The model for schooling still very often involves gathering large numbers of children together into a single building, dividing them into groups by age, and placing an adult with some textbooks in front of them.
    Yet the evidence around us shows that young people, and increasingly adults too, learn from their peers. If they want to find something out they go on the web, searching for a user group or search engine, rather than asking a nearby figure of authority. Of course, there are problems with this. You can get the wrong, or false, answers. You can fail to understand the information or its context. But shouldn't we take more note of how young people learn? When they get a new mobile phone or computer, they never read the manual. They learn by doing or by asking their peers in online communities. This may not work for all young people but it can be great for those who find conventional schooling unbearable. Take the 'Not School' initiative that has had great success with pupils who have been excluded from school. Instead of putting them all together in a special unit, it created a virtual school, where pupils learned from home, interacting over the Internet.
    So, 20 years on, is the Education Reform Act still the right approach? Or is it time we broke out of a 19th century model of the teacher at the front of each class, delivering a prescribed curriculum, and constrained by regular pencil and paper National Tests? I don't know the answers to these questions, but I'd be interested to hear yours. It's something to contemplate over the summer school holidays.
    In the passage, what does 'horizontal' stand for?
     

    A) Parallel to east toward x-axis

    B) Horizon school: Technology and Learning

    C) Horizon scanning: Technology and Learning

    D) Horizon scanning: Teaching and Learning

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer11)

    What is the future for schools? The 20th anniversary of the far-reaching 1988 Education Reform Act, which was commemorated this week, seems an appropriate moment for a pause for reflection on where we should be heading with schooling. The Act, which introduced the National Curriculum and its associated school tests in England and Wales, was a pivotal moment. Central Government took unprecedented powers to decide what and how children should learn.
    Ever since getting their hands on the levers of control, successive governments have never relaxed their grip. But do we still need a National Curriculum?
    And why are schools still based on a 19th century model when we are now several years into the 21st century? As it happens, these were also the questions aired at a gathering of education experts I attended recently in the unlikely setting of the North Tower of London's Tower Bridge. The event was part of Horizontal, it stands for 'Horizon Scanning: Technology and Learning', a futurology project funded by the Department for Children Schools and Families and organized by Professor Stephen Heppell.
    Bridge to the future
    The issues it sets out to address- what shape education should take in the future- are as relevant to England and Wales, and the rest of the UK, as they are to both advanced and developing nations around the world. There was a time when every country aspired to have a National Airline in much the same way as they felt the need for a National Curriculum. The setting was inspirational and apt. We were inside Tower Bridge, high above the River Thames at the heart of London, with road and river traffic teeming far below. It was inspirational because it offered new perspectives on familiar and traditional objects. It was apt because when Tower Bridge was designed it was an example of an innovative solution to a long-term problem: how to keep London's increasingly busy road traffic moving without disrupting a busy river port.
    The experts came from all over the world. They were educators and economists, teachers and administrators, bankers and entrepreneurs. Some inhabited the world of centralized, tax-funded government provision. Others belonged to the voluntary sector. Yet others were active in the for-profit world of private enterprise. Discussion focused around why schooling had failed to change radically when so many other spheres of life had been transformed.
    Globalization: Now most have accepted there is no need for a government-owned, nationally branded airline. Why then do we still feel the need for our own distinctive National Curriculum rather than taking a 'pick n mix' selection from the best bits of curricular around the world? As Professor Heppell noted, modern economies do not try to do everything anymore. There are just a handful of countries that continue with car-making, or try to excel at film-making. The rest import cars and films from those places acknowledged as world's best.
    So why don't we do the same in education. If a country, Finland for example, has found a schooling model that consistently leads the world, why don't we import it either wholesale or at least in parts? Or, more radically, if a private school chain from Sweden or the USA has developed an effective model why don't governments hire them rather than persisting with their own failing models? Is providing charitable donations of second-hand computers to schools in the developing world really the best way to stimulate education reform? Or should government offer contracts to the private sector to make investments in the country's educational infrastructure in return for a long-term payback as a more educated and prosperous nation starts to buy its products?
    These are, of course, controversial questions. They raise ethical issues. They rarely prompt easy answers. But it does seem right to be asking them.
    User-generated learning
    As Professor Heppell pointed out other sectors have been transformed by technological change. Take broadcasting, for example, two decades ago, or even less, it was nice and simple: the broadcasters made programmes for the audience. No one strayed much over the dividing line. Now not only do the established broadcasters appeal for, and broadcast, 'user-generated content', but they are losing out to the likes of YouTube where users provide their own material. Or, closer to the world of learning, look at what has happened with encyclopedias. Once families saved up to fill a whole shelf at home with several volumes, then these were condensed onto a single CD-ROM for a smaller price. Now it is all free online and- with Wikipedia -you can even add your own entries.
    So why has this not happened with schools? Why, despite the rhetoric about personalized learning, do we still have National Curricula and National Testing?
    Why, for that matter, are schoolrooms still much the same in terms of size, shape and focus as they were 150 years ago when mass education began in Britain and learning methods were so different?
    Political grip
    One answer to emerge from the event was that, unlike many industries, education is still firmly in the grip of governments. The consensus was that governments are generally not very good at innovation or risk-taking. Nor do they tend to take the long view (the sponsoring of this event by the DCSF being a notable exception) as they work to four or five year cycles. Where new technologies have been used they tend to reinforce existing teaching and learning methods rather than taking us off in new directions. The model for schooling still very often involves gathering large numbers of children together into a single building, dividing them into groups by age, and placing an adult with some textbooks in front of them.
    Yet the evidence around us shows that young people, and increasingly adults too, learn from their peers. If they want to find something out they go on the web, searching for a user group or search engine, rather than asking a nearby figure of authority. Of course, there are problems with this. You can get the wrong, or false, answers. You can fail to understand the information or its context. But shouldn't we take more note of how young people learn? When they get a new mobile phone or computer, they never read the manual. They learn by doing or by asking their peers in online communities. This may not work for all young people but it can be great for those who find conventional schooling unbearable. Take the 'Not School' initiative that has had great success with pupils who have been excluded from school. Instead of putting them all together in a special unit, it created a virtual school, where pupils learned from home, interacting over the Internet.
    So, 20 years on, is the Education Reform Act still the right approach? Or is it time we broke out of a 19th century model of the teacher at the front of each class, delivering a prescribed curriculum, and constrained by regular pencil and paper National Tests? I don't know the answers to these questions, but I'd be interested to hear yours. It's something to contemplate over the summer school holidays.
    The countries which introduced the National Curriculum are:
     

    A) England and Wales             

    B) Finland and Wales

    C) England and Dales             

    D) England and Europe

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer12)

    What is the future for schools? The 20th anniversary of the far-reaching 1988 Education Reform Act, which was commemorated this week, seems an appropriate moment for a pause for reflection on where we should be heading with schooling. The Act, which introduced the National Curriculum and its associated school tests in England and Wales, was a pivotal moment. Central Government took unprecedented powers to decide what and how children should learn.
    Ever since getting their hands on the levers of control, successive governments have never relaxed their grip. But do we still need a National Curriculum?
    And why are schools still based on a 19th century model when we are now several years into the 21st century? As it happens, these were also the questions aired at a gathering of education experts I attended recently in the unlikely setting of the North Tower of London's Tower Bridge. The event was part of Horizontal, it stands for 'Horizon Scanning: Technology and Learning', a futurology project funded by the Department for Children Schools and Families and organized by Professor Stephen Heppell.
    Bridge to the future
    The issues it sets out to address- what shape education should take in the future- are as relevant to England and Wales, and the rest of the UK, as they are to both advanced and developing nations around the world. There was a time when every country aspired to have a National Airline in much the same way as they felt the need for a National Curriculum. The setting was inspirational and apt. We were inside Tower Bridge, high above the River Thames at the heart of London, with road and river traffic teeming far below. It was inspirational because it offered new perspectives on familiar and traditional objects. It was apt because when Tower Bridge was designed it was an example of an innovative solution to a long-term problem: how to keep London's increasingly busy road traffic moving without disrupting a busy river port.
    The experts came from all over the world. They were educators and economists, teachers and administrators, bankers and entrepreneurs. Some inhabited the world of centralized, tax-funded government provision. Others belonged to the voluntary sector. Yet others were active in the for-profit world of private enterprise. Discussion focused around why schooling had failed to change radically when so many other spheres of life had been transformed.
    Globalization: Now most have accepted there is no need for a government-owned, nationally branded airline. Why then do we still feel the need for our own distinctive National Curriculum rather than taking a 'pick n mix' selection from the best bits of curricular around the world? As Professor Heppell noted, modern economies do not try to do everything anymore. There are just a handful of countries that continue with car-making, or try to excel at film-making. The rest import cars and films from those places acknowledged as world's best.
    So why don't we do the same in education. If a country, Finland for example, has found a schooling model that consistently leads the world, why don't we import it either wholesale or at least in parts? Or, more radically, if a private school chain from Sweden or the USA has developed an effective model why don't governments hire them rather than persisting with their own failing models? Is providing charitable donations of second-hand computers to schools in the developing world really the best way to stimulate education reform? Or should government offer contracts to the private sector to make investments in the country's educational infrastructure in return for a long-term payback as a more educated and prosperous nation starts to buy its products?
    These are, of course, controversial questions. They raise ethical issues. They rarely prompt easy answers. But it does seem right to be asking them.
    User-generated learning
    As Professor Heppell pointed out other sectors have been transformed by technological change. Take broadcasting, for example, two decades ago, or even less, it was nice and simple: the broadcasters made programmes for the audience. No one strayed much over the dividing line. Now not only do the established broadcasters appeal for, and broadcast, 'user-generated content', but they are losing out to the likes of YouTube where users provide their own material. Or, closer to the world of learning, look at what has happened with encyclopedias. Once families saved up to fill a whole shelf at home with several volumes, then these were condensed onto a single CD-ROM for a smaller price. Now it is all free online and- with Wikipedia -you can even add your own entries.
    So why has this not happened with schools? Why, despite the rhetoric about personalized learning, do we still have National Curricula and National Testing?
    Why, for that matter, are schoolrooms still much the same in terms of size, shape and focus as they were 150 years ago when mass education began in Britain and learning methods were so different?
    Political grip
    One answer to emerge from the event was that, unlike many industries, education is still firmly in the grip of governments. The consensus was that governments are generally not very good at innovation or risk-taking. Nor do they tend to take the long view (the sponsoring of this event by the DCSF being a notable exception) as they work to four or five year cycles. Where new technologies have been used they tend to reinforce existing teaching and learning methods rather than taking us off in new directions. The model for schooling still very often involves gathering large numbers of children together into a single building, dividing them into groups by age, and placing an adult with some textbooks in front of them.
    Yet the evidence around us shows that young people, and increasingly adults too, learn from their peers. If they want to find something out they go on the web, searching for a user group or search engine, rather than asking a nearby figure of authority. Of course, there are problems with this. You can get the wrong, or false, answers. You can fail to understand the information or its context. But shouldn't we take more note of how young people learn? When they get a new mobile phone or computer, they never read the manual. They learn by doing or by asking their peers in online communities. This may not work for all young people but it can be great for those who find conventional schooling unbearable. Take the 'Not School' initiative that has had great success with pupils who have been excluded from school. Instead of putting them all together in a special unit, it created a virtual school, where pupils learned from home, interacting over the Internet.
    So, 20 years on, is the Education Reform Act still the right approach? Or is it time we broke out of a 19th century model of the teacher at the front of each class, delivering a prescribed curriculum, and constrained by regular pencil and paper National Tests? I don't know the answers to these questions, but I'd be interested to hear yours. It's something to contemplate over the summer school holidays.
    In England which innovative solution to a long-term problem was invented?
     

    A) Temple Bridge              

    B) Tentive Bridge

    C) Tall Bridge                   

    D) Tower Bridge

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow

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