10th Class English Comprehension Question Bank

done Comprehensions Based on Stories

Question Bank
  • question_answer1)

    Read the following given below and answer the questions that follow:
    I was flying my old Dakota aeroplane over France back to England. I was dreaming of my holiday and looking forward to being with my family. I looked at my watch: one thirty in the morning. 'I should call Paris Control soon,' I thought. As I looked down past the nose of the aeroplane, I saw the lights of a big city in front of me. I switched on the radio and said, "Paris Control, Dakota DS 088 here. Can you hear me? I'm on my way to England. Over." The voice from the radio answered me immediately: "DS 088, I can hear you. You ought to turn twelve degrees west now, DS 088. Over" I checked the map and the compass, switched over my second and last fuel tank, and turned the Dakota twelve degrees west towards England. 'I'll be in time for breakfast,' I thought. A good big English breakfast! Everything was going well-it was an easy flight. Paris was about 150 kilometers behind me when I saw the clouds. Storm clouds. They were huge. They looked like black mountains standing in front of me across the sky. I knew I could not fly up and over them, and I did not have enough fuel to fly around them to the north or south.
    The pilot tried to contact:

    A) Police Control Room     

    B) Paris Control

    C) France Control

    D) Fire Control Room

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer2)

    Read the following given below and answer the questions that follow:
    I was flying my old Dakota aeroplane over France back to England. I was dreaming of my holiday and looking forward to being with my family. I looked at my watch: one thirty in the morning. 'I should call Paris Control soon,' I thought. As I looked down past the nose of the aeroplane, I saw the lights of a big city in front of me. I switched on the radio and said, "Paris Control, Dakota DS 088 here. Can you hear me? I'm on my way to England. Over." The voice from the radio answered me immediately: "DS 088, I can hear you. You ought to turn twelve degrees west now, DS 088. Over" I checked the map and the compass, switched over my second and last fuel tank, and turned the Dakota twelve degrees west towards England. 'I'll be in time for breakfast,' I thought. A good big English breakfast! Everything was going well-it was an easy flight. Paris was about 150 kilometers behind me when I saw the clouds. Storm clouds. They were huge. They looked like black mountains standing in front of me across the sky. I knew I could not fly up and over them, and I did not have enough fuel to fly around them to the north or south.
    The voice of radio answered him to turn:
     

    A) 12 degrees North

    B) 12 degrees South

    C) 12 degrees East

    D) 12 degrees West

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer3)

    Read the following given below and answer the questions that follow:
    I was flying my old Dakota aeroplane over France back to England. I was dreaming of my holiday and looking forward to being with my family. I looked at my watch: one thirty in the morning. 'I should call Paris Control soon,' I thought. As I looked down past the nose of the aeroplane, I saw the lights of a big city in front of me. I switched on the radio and said, "Paris Control, Dakota DS 088 here. Can you hear me? I'm on my way to England. Over." The voice from the radio answered me immediately: "DS 088, I can hear you. You ought to turn twelve degrees west now, DS 088. Over" I checked the map and the compass, switched over my second and last fuel tank, and turned the Dakota twelve degrees west towards England. 'I'll be in time for breakfast,' I thought. A good big English breakfast! Everything was going well-it was an easy flight. Paris was about 150 kilometers behind me when I saw the clouds. Storm clouds. They were huge. They looked like black mountains standing in front of me across the sky. I knew I could not fly up and over them, and I did not have enough fuel to fly around them to the north or south.
    The pilot was flying an old plane named as:
     

    A) Jakota                         

    B) Dakota

    C) Langota                       

    D) Durkins

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer4)

    Read the following given below and answer the questions that follow:
    I was flying my old Dakota aeroplane over France back to England. I was dreaming of my holiday and looking forward to being with my family. I looked at my watch: one thirty in the morning. 'I should call Paris Control soon,' I thought. As I looked down past the nose of the aeroplane, I saw the lights of a big city in front of me. I switched on the radio and said, "Paris Control, Dakota DS 088 here. Can you hear me? I'm on my way to England. Over." The voice from the radio answered me immediately: "DS 088, I can hear you. You ought to turn twelve degrees west now, DS 088. Over" I checked the map and the compass, switched over my second and last fuel tank, and turned the Dakota twelve degrees west towards England. 'I'll be in time for breakfast,' I thought. A good big English breakfast! Everything was going well-it was an easy flight. Paris was about 150 kilometers behind me when I saw the clouds. Storm clouds. They were huge. They looked like black mountains standing in front of me across the sky. I knew I could not fly up and over them, and I did not have enough fuel to fly around them to the north or south.
    What was the time by pilots watch?
     

    A) 1:30 am     

    B) 2:30 am

    C) 11:30 am                     

    D) 4:50 am

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer5)

    It had happened when I was ten or eleven years old. I had decided to learn to swim. There was a pool at the Y.M.C.A. in Yakima that offered exactly the opportunity. The Yakima River was treacherous. Mother continually warned against it, and kept fresh in my mind the details of each drowning in the river. But the Y.M.C.A. pool was safe. It was only two or three feet deep at the shallow end; and while it was nine feet deep at the other, the drop was gradual. I got a pair of water wings and went to the pool. I hated to walk naked into it and show my skinny legs. But I subdued my pride and did it. From the beginning, however, I had a gyneolatry aversion to the water when I was in it. This started when I was three or four years old and father took me to the beach in California. He and I stood together in the surf. I hung on to him, yet the waves knocked me down and swept over me. I was buried in water. My breath was gone. I was frightened. Father laughed, but there was terror in my heart at the over-powering force of the waves. My introduction to the Y.M.CA. swimming pool revived unpleasant memories and stirred childish fears. But in a little while I gathered confidence. I paddled with my new water wings, watching the other boys and trying to learn by aping them. I did so two or three times on different days and was just beginning to feel at ease in the water when the misadventure happened. I went to the pool when no one else was there. The place was quiet. The water was still, and the tiled bottom was as white and clean as a bath tub. I was timid about going in alone, so I sat on the side of the pool to wait for others.
    Once the author's father took him to the beach of:
     

    A) Goa                            

    B) California  

    C) Juhu                           

    D) Brazil

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer6)

    It had happened when I was ten or eleven years old. I had decided to learn to swim. There was a pool at the Y.M.C.A. in Yakima that offered exactly the opportunity. The Yakima River was treacherous. Mother continually warned against it, and kept fresh in my mind the details of each drowning in the river. But the Y.M.C.A. pool was safe. It was only two or three feet deep at the shallow end; and while it was nine feet deep at the other, the drop was gradual. I got a pair of water wings and went to the pool. I hated to walk naked into it and show my skinny legs. But I subdued my pride and did it. From the beginning, however, I had a gyneolatry aversion to the water when I was in it. This started when I was three or four years old and father took me to the beach in California. He and I stood together in the surf. I hung on to him, yet the waves knocked me down and swept over me. I was buried in water. My breath was gone. I was frightened. Father laughed, but there was terror in my heart at the over-powering force of the waves. My introduction to the Y.M.CA. swimming pool revived unpleasant memories and stirred childish fears. But in a little while I gathered confidence. I paddled with my new water wings, watching the other boys and trying to learn by aping them. I did so two or three times on different days and was just beginning to feel at ease in the water when the misadventure happened. I went to the pool when no one else was there. The place was quiet. The water was still, and the tiled bottom was as white and clean as a bath tub. I was timid about going in alone, so I sat on the side of the pool to wait for others.
    What was the maximum depth of the swimming pool?
     

    A) 3 feet                          

    B) 6 feet      

    C) 9 feet                          

    D) 10 feet

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer7)

    It had happened when I was ten or eleven years old. I had decided to learn to swim. There was a pool at the Y.M.C.A. in Yakima that offered exactly the opportunity. The Yakima River was treacherous. Mother continually warned against it, and kept fresh in my mind the details of each drowning in the river. But the Y.M.C.A. pool was safe. It was only two or three feet deep at the shallow end; and while it was nine feet deep at the other, the drop was gradual. I got a pair of water wings and went to the pool. I hated to walk naked into it and show my skinny legs. But I subdued my pride and did it. From the beginning, however, I had a gyneolatry aversion to the water when I was in it. This started when I was three or four years old and father took me to the beach in California. He and I stood together in the surf. I hung on to him, yet the waves knocked me down and swept over me. I was buried in water. My breath was gone. I was frightened. Father laughed, but there was terror in my heart at the over-powering force of the waves. My introduction to the Y.M.CA. swimming pool revived unpleasant memories and stirred childish fears. But in a little while I gathered confidence. I paddled with my new water wings, watching the other boys and trying to learn by aping them. I did so two or three times on different days and was just beginning to feel at ease in the water when the misadventure happened. I went to the pool when no one else was there. The place was quiet. The water was still, and the tiled bottom was as white and clean as a bath tub. I was timid about going in alone, so I sat on the side of the pool to wait for others.
    When the author went to Yakima river to swim, he was hardly:
     

    A) 8 or 9 years old                  

    B) 10 or 11 years old

    C) 13 or 14 years old               

    D) 15 or 17 years old

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer8)

    It had happened when I was ten or eleven years old. I had decided to learn to swim. There was a pool at the Y.M.C.A. in Yakima that offered exactly the opportunity. The Yakima River was treacherous. Mother continually warned against it, and kept fresh in my mind the details of each drowning in the river. But the Y.M.C.A. pool was safe. It was only two or three feet deep at the shallow end; and while it was nine feet deep at the other, the drop was gradual. I got a pair of water wings and went to the pool. I hated to walk naked into it and show my skinny legs. But I subdued my pride and did it. From the beginning, however, I had a gyneolatry aversion to the water when I was in it. This started when I was three or four years old and father took me to the beach in California. He and I stood together in the surf. I hung on to him, yet the waves knocked me down and swept over me. I was buried in water. My breath was gone. I was frightened. Father laughed, but there was terror in my heart at the over-powering force of the waves. My introduction to the Y.M.CA. swimming pool revived unpleasant memories and stirred childish fears. But in a little while I gathered confidence. I paddled with my new water wings, watching the other boys and trying to learn by aping them. I did so two or three times on different days and was just beginning to feel at ease in the water when the misadventure happened. I went to the pool when no one else was there. The place was quiet. The water was still, and the tiled bottom was as white and clean as a bath tub. I was timid about going in alone, so I sat on the side of the pool to wait for others.
    The author's nature towards the pools or river was:
     

    A) Timid         

    B) Heroic

    C) Exerted                        

    D) Adventures.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer9)

    Once upon a time there was a man who went around selling small rat traps of wire. He made them himself at odd moments, from the material he got by begging in the stores or at the big farms. But even so, the business was not specially profitable, so he had to resort to both begging and petty thievery to keep body and soul together. Even so, his clothes were in rags, his cheeks were sunken, and hunger gleamed in his eyes. No one can imagine how sad and monotonous life can appear to such a vagabond, who plods along the road, left to his own conditions. But one day this man had fallen into a line of thought, which really seemed to him entertaining. He had naturally been thinking of his rat traps when suddenly he was struck by the idea that the whole world about him-the whole world with its lands and seas, its cities and villages-was nothing but a big rat trap. It had never existed for any other purpose than to set baits for people. It offered riches and joys, shelter and food, heat and clothing, exactly as the rat trap offered cheese and pork, and as soon as anyone let himself be tempted to touch the bait, it closed in on him, and then everything came to an end. The world had, of course, never been very kind to him, so it gave him unwonted joy to think ill of it in this way. It became a cherished pastime of his, during many dreary plodding’s, to think of people he knew who had let themselves be caught in the dangerous snare, and of others who were still circling around the bait.
    A sales person used to sell:

    A) Wired rat traps              

    B) Ropes

    C) Garland                       

    D) Bracelets

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer10)

    Once upon a time there was a man who went around selling small rat traps of wire. He made them himself at odd moments, from the material he got by begging in the stores or at the big farms. But even so, the business was not specially profitable, so he had to resort to both begging and petty thievery to keep body and soul together. Even so, his clothes were in rags, his cheeks were sunken, and hunger gleamed in his eyes. No one can imagine how sad and monotonous life can appear to such a vagabond, who plods along the road, left to his own conditions. But one day this man had fallen into a line of thought, which really seemed to him entertaining. He had naturally been thinking of his rat traps when suddenly he was struck by the idea that the whole world about him-the whole world with its lands and seas, its cities and villages-was nothing but a big rat trap. It had never existed for any other purpose than to set baits for people. It offered riches and joys, shelter and food, heat and clothing, exactly as the rat trap offered cheese and pork, and as soon as anyone let himself be tempted to touch the bait, it closed in on him, and then everything came to an end. The world had, of course, never been very kind to him, so it gave him unwonted joy to think ill of it in this way. It became a cherished pastime of his, during many dreary plodding’s, to think of people he knew who had let themselves be caught in the dangerous snare, and of others who were still circling around the bait.
    He was not able to manage his necessities only by begging then he continued:

    A) Hardworking

    B) Petty thievery

    C) Working in farm land

    D) Selling fruits

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer11)

    Once upon a time there was a man who went around selling small rat traps of wire. He made them himself at odd moments, from the material he got by begging in the stores or at the big farms. But even so, the business was not specially profitable, so he had to resort to both begging and petty thievery to keep body and soul together. Even so, his clothes were in rags, his cheeks were sunken, and hunger gleamed in his eyes. No one can imagine how sad and monotonous life can appear to such a vagabond, who plods along the road, left to his own conditions. But one day this man had fallen into a line of thought, which really seemed to him entertaining. He had naturally been thinking of his rat traps when suddenly he was struck by the idea that the whole world about him-the whole world with its lands and seas, its cities and villages-was nothing but a big rat trap. It had never existed for any other purpose than to set baits for people. It offered riches and joys, shelter and food, heat and clothing, exactly as the rat trap offered cheese and pork, and as soon as anyone let himself be tempted to touch the bait, it closed in on him, and then everything came to an end. The world had, of course, never been very kind to him, so it gave him unwonted joy to think ill of it in this way. It became a cherished pastime of his, during many dreary plodding’s, to think of people he knew who had let themselves be caught in the dangerous snare, and of others who were still circling around the bait.
    The salesman compared this world and material with:
     

    A) A big house

    B) A big rat trap

    C) A big cage

    D) A big prison

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer12)

    Once upon a time there was a man who went around selling small rat traps of wire. He made them himself at odd moments, from the material he got by begging in the stores or at the big farms. But even so, the business was not specially profitable, so he had to resort to both begging and petty thievery to keep body and soul together. Even so, his clothes were in rags, his cheeks were sunken, and hunger gleamed in his eyes. No one can imagine how sad and monotonous life can appear to such a vagabond, who plods along the road, left to his own conditions. But one day this man had fallen into a line of thought, which really seemed to him entertaining. He had naturally been thinking of his rat traps when suddenly he was struck by the idea that the whole world about him-the whole world with its lands and seas, its cities and villages-was nothing but a big rat trap. It had never existed for any other purpose than to set baits for people. It offered riches and joys, shelter and food, heat and clothing, exactly as the rat trap offered cheese and pork, and as soon as anyone let himself be tempted to touch the bait, it closed in on him, and then everything came to an end. The world had, of course, never been very kind to him, so it gave him unwonted joy to think ill of it in this way. It became a cherished pastime of his, during many dreary plodding’s, to think of people he knew who had let themselves be caught in the dangerous snare, and of others who were still circling around the bait.
    The life of rat comes to an end when it tries to find:
     

    A) Gate                           

    B) Window

    C) Bait                            

    D) Walls

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow

Study Package

Questions - Comprehensions Based on Stories
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