7th Class English Comprehension Question Bank

done Comprehensions Based on General Topics

Question Bank
  • question_answer1)

    Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Anxiety and conscience are a pair of powerful dynamos. Of course, I can only speak for myself. Between them, they have ensured that one shall work at anything worthwhile. They are blind forces which drive but do not direct. Fortunately, I have also been moved by a third motive- the wish to see and understand. Curiosity is another motive for action. It is also one of the distinctive characteristics of human nature and contrasted with the natures of nonhuman animals. All human beings have curiosity in some degree. We also have it about things which are of no practical use.
    Curiosity may be focused on anything in the universe, but the spiritual reality of the phenomena should be the ultimate objective of all curiosity for it to be fruitful. Thanks to my mother my approach to this ultimate objective of all curiosity is fruitful. My approach to this ultimate objective is through the story of human affairs.
    What is the main objective of this passage?

    A) Distinguish between human beings and animals

    B) Project curiosity as a potent motivating factor

    C) Project anxiety and conscience as inadequate

    D) Motivation and spiritual reality

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer2)

    Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Anxiety and conscience are a pair of powerful dynamos. Of course, I can only speak for myself. Between them, they have ensured that one shall work at anything worthwhile. They are blind forces which drive but do not direct. Fortunately, I have also been moved by a third motive- the wish to see and understand. Curiosity is another motive for action. It is also one of the distinctive characteristics of human nature and contrasted with the natures of nonhuman animals. All human beings have curiosity in some degree. We also have it about things which are of no practical use.
    Curiosity may be focused on anything in the universe, but the spiritual reality of the phenomena should be the ultimate objective of all curiosity for it to be fruitful. Thanks to my mother my approach to this ultimate objective of all curiosity is fruitful. My approach to this ultimate objective is through the story of human affairs.
    A characteristic peculiar to human beings that is referred to is:

    A) superior intelligence.

    B) spirit of enquiry.

    C) capacity to rationalise and analyse.

    D) ability to shift the practical from the impractical.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer3)

    Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Anxiety and conscience are a pair of powerful dynamos. Of course, I can only speak for myself. Between them, they have ensured that one shall work at anything worthwhile. They are blind forces which drive but do not direct. Fortunately, I have also been moved by a third motive- the wish to see and understand. Curiosity is another motive for action. It is also one of the distinctive characteristics of human nature and contrasted with the natures of nonhuman animals. All human beings have curiosity in some degree. We also have it about things which are of no practical use.
    Curiosity may be focused on anything in the universe, but the spiritual reality of the phenomena should be the ultimate objective of all curiosity for it to be fruitful. Thanks to my mother my approach to this ultimate objective of all curiosity is fruitful. My approach to this ultimate objective is through the story of human affairs.
    Which of the following statements is true according to the passage?

    A) Animals are as curious as human beings.

    B) Curiosity is the only motive for action.

    C) People motivated by curiosity do not need other motives to guide them.

    D) People motivated by anxiety and conscience alone can be misdirected.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer4)

    Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Anxiety and conscience are a pair of powerful dynamos. Of course, I can only speak for myself. Between them, they have ensured that one shall work at anything worthwhile. They are blind forces which drive but do not direct. Fortunately, I have also been moved by a third motive- the wish to see and understand. Curiosity is another motive for action. It is also one of the distinctive characteristics of human nature and contrasted with the natures of nonhuman animals. All human beings have curiosity in some degree. We also have it about things which are of no practical use.
    Curiosity may be focused on anything in the universe, but the spiritual reality of the phenomena should be the ultimate objective of all curiosity for it to be fruitful. Thanks to my mother my approach to this ultimate objective of all curiosity is fruitful. My approach to this ultimate objective is through the story of human affairs.
    According to the author:

    A) those who have little curiosity are curious about unimportant things.

    B) apart from humans no other living beings have the gift of curiosity.

    C) the highest form of curiosity can be satisfied by study of human affairs alone.

    D) spiritual reality is the ultimate goal of humans through action.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer5)

    Read the following passages carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Anxiety and conscience are a pair of powerful dynamos. Of course, I can only speak for myself. Between them, they have ensured that one shall work at anything worthwhile. They are blind forces which drive but do not direct. Fortunately, I have also been moved by a third motive- the wish to see and understand. Curiosity is another motive for action. It is also one of the distinctive characteristics of human nature and contrasted with the natures of nonhuman animals. All human beings have curiosity in some degree. We also have it about things which are of no practical use.
    Curiosity may be focused on anything in the universe, but the spiritual reality of the phenomena should be the ultimate objective of all curiosity for it to be fruitful. Thanks to my mother my approach to this ultimate objective of all curiosity is fruitful. My approach to this ultimate objective is through the story of human affairs.
    The author subscribes to the view that:

    A) ones curiosity should focus beyond the facade on the latent meaning of things

    B) curiosity is an inherited family characteristic.

    C) a study of human affairs is the most effective method of satisfying one's curiosity

    D) in order to motivate, curiosity must be coupled with anxiety and conscience.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer6)

    Compact discs (CDs) have revolutionised the music industry with their surprisingly realistic sandwiches with aluminium at the centre. They have digitally recorded material that is read by laser beams, so the sound does not crackle like of vinyl records. CDs are also virtually indestructible, and they are lighter and smaller than conventional records. Since their introduction, CDs have become more affordable and widely available. In fact, they are now sold in electronics and video stores that did not formerly carry records or cassettes.
    There has been a phenomenal growth in the sale of CDs. Sales climbed dramatically during the second half of the 1980s. In the 1990s sales have been even greater CDs have all but replaced records in stores and, in spite of their being less affordable than cassettes, they continue to gain popularity.
    The main appeal of CDs in music industry is their:

    A) Price

    B) Size

    C) Availability

    D) Sound

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer7)

    Compact discs (CDs) have revolutionised the music industry with their surprisingly realistic sandwiches with aluminium at the centre. They have digitally recorded material that is read by laser beams, so the sound does not crackle like of vinyl records. CDs are also virtually indestructible, and they are lighter and smaller than conventional records. Since their introduction, CDs have become more affordable and widely available. In fact, they are now sold in electronics and video stores that did not formerly carry records or cassettes.
    There has been a phenomenal growth in the sale of CDs. Sales climbed dramatically during the second half of the 1980s. In the 1990s sales have been even greater CDs have all but replaced records in stores and, in spite of their being less affordable than cassettes, they continue to gain popularity.
    The word 'revolutionized' as used in line 1 could best be replaced by:

    A) Changed

    B) Fought

    C) Surprised

    D) Marked

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer8)

    Compact discs (CDs) have revolutionised the music industry with their surprisingly realistic sandwiches with aluminium at the centre. They have digitally recorded material that is read by laser beams, so the sound does not crackle like of vinyl records. CDs are also virtually indestructible, and they are lighter and smaller than conventional records. Since their introduction, CDs have become more affordable and widely available. In fact, they are now sold in electronics and video stores that did not formerly carry records or cassettes.
    There has been a phenomenal growth in the sale of CDs. Sales climbed dramatically during the second half of the 1980s. In the 1990s sales have been even greater CDs have all but replaced records in stores and, in spite of their being less affordable than cassettes, they continue to gain popularity.
    The author refers to CDs as 'sandwiches' because they:
     

    A) are light.                      

    B) are small.

    C) are layered.                  

    D) don't crackle.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer9)

    Compact discs (CDs) have revolutionised the music industry with their surprisingly realistic sandwiches with aluminium at the centre. They have digitally recorded material that is read by laser beams, so the sound does not crackle like of vinyl records. CDs are also virtually indestructible, and they are lighter and smaller than conventional records. Since their introduction, CDs have become more affordable and widely available. In fact, they are now sold in electronics and video stores that did not formerly carry records or cassettes.
    There has been a phenomenal growth in the sale of CDs. Sales climbed dramatically during the second half of the 1980s. In the 1990s sales have been even greater CDs have all but replaced records in stores and, in spite of their being less affordable than cassettes, they continue to gain popularity.
    According to the passage, which one of the following is true?

    A) New kinds of stores are selling CDs.

    B) CDs are available as cassettes.

    C) Stores are selling more CDs than cassettes.

    D) Stores are losing money on their cassettes.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer10)

    Compact discs (CDs) have revolutionised the music industry with their surprisingly realistic sandwiches with aluminium at the centre. They have digitally recorded material that is read by laser beams, so the sound does not crackle like of vinyl records. CDs are also virtually indestructible, and they are lighter and smaller than conventional records. Since their introduction, CDs have become more affordable and widely available. In fact, they are now sold in electronics and video stores that did not formerly carry records or cassettes.
    There has been a phenomenal growth in the sale of CDs. Sales climbed dramatically during the second half of the 1980s. In the 1990s sales have been even greater CDs have all but replaced records in stores and, in spite of their being less affordable than cassettes, they continue to gain popularity.
    The author's main purpose is to:

    A) tell how CDs are made.

    B) discuss the growth of scale CDs.

    C) compare CDs to sandwiches.

    D) describe the stores that sell CDs.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer11)

    Both plants and animals of many sorts show remarkable changes in form, structure, growth habits and even mode of reproduction in becoming adapted to different climatic environment, types of food supply or mode of living. This divergence in response to evolution is commonly expressed by altering the form and function of some part or parts of the organism, the original identity of which is clearly visible. For example, in marine pteropods the creeping foot of the snail is modified into flapping organs useful for swimming. It is changed into prehensile arms that bear suctorial disks. The limbs have been modified into different organs in different animals. For cursorial animals like horse and antelope it has been adopted as a limb and helps the animals in running. For arboreal animals like monkeys it helps in swinging in trees. For fossorial animals like moles and gophers they help for digging. For volants like bats they help in flying. For aquatic animals as in the seals and whales they help in swimming. Thus, the fingers and wristbones of a bat and whale, for instance, have virtually nothing in common except that they are definitely equivalent elements of the mammalian limb.
    Which of the following is the most appropriate title for the passage, based on its content?
     

    A) Evolution 

    B) Our changing bodies

    C) Adaptive divergence             

    D) Changes in organs

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer12)

    Both plants and animals of many sorts show remarkable changes in form, structure, growth habits and even mode of reproduction in becoming adapted to different climatic environment, types of food supply or mode of living. This divergence in response to evolution is commonly expressed by altering the form and function of some part or parts of the organism, the original identity of which is clearly visible. For example, in marine pteropods the creeping foot of the snail is modified into flapping organs useful for swimming. It is changed into prehensile arms that bear suctorial disks. The limbs have been modified into different organs in different animals. For cursorial animals like horse and antelope it has been adopted as a limb and helps the animals in running. For arboreal animals like monkeys it helps in swinging in trees. For fossorial animals like moles and gophers they help for digging. For volants like bats they help in flying. For aquatic animals as in the seals and whales they help in swimming. Thus, the fingers and wristbones of a bat and whale, for instance, have virtually nothing in common except that they are definitely equivalent elements of the mammalian limb.
    The author provides information that would answer which of the following questions:
    I.  What factors cause change in organism?
    II. What is the theory of evolution?
     

    A) I only                          

    B) II only

    C) I and II      

    D) Either I or II

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer13)

    Both plants and animals of many sorts show remarkable changes in form, structure, growth habits and even mode of reproduction in becoming adapted to different climatic environment, types of food supply or mode of living. This divergence in response to evolution is commonly expressed by altering the form and function of some part or parts of the organism, the original identity of which is clearly visible. For example, in marine pteropods the creeping foot of the snail is modified into flapping organs useful for swimming. It is changed into prehensile arms that bear suctorial disks. The limbs have been modified into different organs in different animals. For cursorial animals like horse and antelope it has been adopted as a limb and helps the animals in running. For arboreal animals like monkeys it helps in swinging in trees. For fossorial animals like moles and gophers they help for digging. For volants like bats they help in flying. For aquatic animals as in the seals and whales they help in swimming. Thus, the fingers and wristbones of a bat and whale, for instance, have virtually nothing in common except that they are definitely equivalent elements of the mammalian limb.
    The author organises the passage by:

    A) comparison and contrast.

    B) general statements followed by examples.

    C) hypothesis and proof.

    D) definition of key terms.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer14)

    Both plants and animals of many sorts show remarkable changes in form, structure, growth habits and even mode of reproduction in becoming adapted to different climatic environment, types of food supply or mode of living. This divergence in response to evolution is commonly expressed by altering the form and function of some part or parts of the organism, the original identity of which is clearly visible. For example, in marine pteropods the creeping foot of the snail is modified into flapping organs useful for swimming. It is changed into prehensile arms that bear suctorial disks. The limbs have been modified into different organs in different animals. For cursorial animals like horse and antelope it has been adopted as a limb and helps the animals in running. For arboreal animals like monkeys it helps in swinging in trees. For fossorial animals like moles and gophers they help for digging. For volants like bats they help in flying. For aquatic animals as in the seals and whales they help in swimming. Thus, the fingers and wristbones of a bat and whale, for instance, have virtually nothing in common except that they are definitely equivalent elements of the mammalian limb.
    The author's style can best be described as:
     

    A) Objective  

    B) Humorous

    C) Esoteric                       

    D) Patronising

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer15)

    As medium of literary expression, the common language is inadequate. Like the man of letters, the scientist finds it necessary to "give a purer sense to the words of the tribe", but the purity of scientific language.
    The aim of the scientist is to say only one thing at a time, and to say it unambiguously and with the greatest possible clarity. To achieve this, he simplifies and jargonises. In other words, he uses the vocabulary and syntax of common speech in such a way that each phrase is susceptible to only one interpretation and when the vocabulary and syntax of common speech are too imprecise for his purpose he invites a new technical language, or jargon specially designed to express the limited meaning with which he s professionally concerned.
    The literary artist purifies the language of the tribe in a radically different way. The scientist's aim, as we have seen, is to say one thing, and only one thing at a time. This, most emphatically, is not the aim of the literary artist. Human life is lived simultaneously on many levels and has many meanings. Literature is a device for reporting the multifarious facts and expressing their various significance. When the literary artist undertakes to give a pure sense to the words of his tribe, he does so with the express purpose of creating a language capable of conveying, not the single meaning of some particular science, but the multiple significance of human experience, its most private as well as on its more public levels.
    The passage highlights the difference between:

    A) the language of science and of literature.

    B) the language of the tribe and that of a civilised man.

    C) jargon and the language of common man.

    D) the central purpose of science and literature.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer16)

    As medium of literary expression, the common language is inadequate. Like the man of letters, the scientist finds it necessary to "give a purer sense to the words of the tribe", but the purity of scientific language.
    The aim of the scientist is to say only one thing at a time, and to say it unambiguously and with the greatest possible clarity. To achieve this, he simplifies and jargonises. In other words, he uses the vocabulary and syntax of common speech in such a way that each phrase is susceptible to only one interpretation and when the vocabulary and syntax of common speech are too imprecise for his purpose he invites a new technical language, or jargon specially designed to express the limited meaning with which he s professionally concerned.
    The literary artist purifies the language of the tribe in a radically different way. The scientist's aim, as we have seen, is to say one thing, and only one thing at a time. This, most emphatically, is not the aim of the literary artist. Human life is lived simultaneously on many levels and has many meanings. Literature is a device for reporting the multifarious facts and expressing their various significance. When the literary artist undertakes to give a pure sense to the words of his tribe, he does so with the express purpose of creating a language capable of conveying, not the single meaning of some particular science, but the multiple significance of human experience, its most private as well as on its more public levels.
    'Jargon' in the context of the passage means:       
     

    A) difficult language.               

    B) technical, language.

    C) language with limited meaning.   

    D) mathematical language,

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer17)

    As medium of literary expression, the common language is inadequate. Like the man of letters, the scientist finds it necessary to "give a purer sense to the words of the tribe", but the purity of scientific language.
    The aim of the scientist is to say only one thing at a time, and to say it unambiguously and with the greatest possible clarity. To achieve this, he simplifies and jargonises. In other words, he uses the vocabulary and syntax of common speech in such a way that each phrase is susceptible to only one interpretation and when the vocabulary and syntax of common speech are too imprecise for his purpose he invites a new technical language, or jargon specially designed to express the limited meaning with which he s professionally concerned.
    The literary artist purifies the language of the tribe in a radically different way. The scientist's aim, as we have seen, is to say one thing, and only one thing at a time. This, most emphatically, is not the aim of the literary artist. Human life is lived simultaneously on many levels and has many meanings. Literature is a device for reporting the multifarious facts and expressing their various significance. When the literary artist undertakes to give a pure sense to the words of his tribe, he does so with the express purpose of creating a language capable of conveying, not the single meaning of some particular science, but the multiple significance of human experience, its most private as well as on its more public levels.
    The purpose of literature according to the is to:

    A) express views privately as well as publicly

    B) report multifarious facts of life.

    C) view life from various planes.

    D) express limited meaning.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer18)

    As medium of literary expression, the common language is inadequate. Like the man of letters, the scientist finds it necessary to "give a purer sense to the words of the tribe", but the purity of scientific language.
    The aim of the scientist is to say only one thing at a time, and to say it unambiguously and with the greatest possible clarity. To achieve this, he simplifies and jargonises. In other words, he uses the vocabulary and syntax of common speech in such a way that each phrase is susceptible to only one interpretation and when the vocabulary and syntax of common speech are too imprecise for his purpose he invites a new technical language, or jargon specially designed to express the limited meaning with which he s professionally concerned.
    The literary artist purifies the language of the tribe in a radically different way. The scientist's aim, as we have seen, is to say one thing, and only one thing at a time. This, most emphatically, is not the aim of the literary artist. Human life is lived simultaneously on many levels and has many meanings. Literature is a device for reporting the multifarious facts and expressing their various significance. When the literary artist undertakes to give a pure sense to the words of his tribe, he does so with the express purpose of creating a language capable of conveying, not the single meaning of some particular science, but the multiple significance of human experience, its most private as well as on its more public levels.
    The language of science is:

    A) Precise

    B) Verbose

    C) Ambiguous

    D) Imprecise

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer19)

    As medium of literary expression, the common language is inadequate. Like the man of letters, the scientist finds it necessary to "give a purer sense to the words of the tribe", but the purity of scientific language.
    The aim of the scientist is to say only one thing at a time, and to say it unambiguously and with the greatest possible clarity. To achieve this, he simplifies and jargonises. In other words, he uses the vocabulary and syntax of common speech in such a way that each phrase is susceptible to only one interpretation and when the vocabulary and syntax of common speech are too imprecise for his purpose he invites a new technical language, or jargon specially designed to express the limited meaning with which he s professionally concerned.
    The literary artist purifies the language of the tribe in a radically different way. The scientist's aim, as we have seen, is to say one thing, and only one thing at a time. This, most emphatically, is not the aim of the literary artist. Human life is lived simultaneously on many levels and has many meanings. Literature is a device for reporting the multifarious facts and expressing their various significance. When the literary artist undertakes to give a pure sense to the words of his tribe, he does so with the express purpose of creating a language capable of conveying, not the single meaning of some particular science, but the multiple significance of human experience, its most private as well as on its more public levels.
    According to the passage:

    A) language of science is pure.

    B) language of literature is pure.

    C) the language of science and that of literature, each m its own way makes for pure expression.

    D) None of the above

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  • question_answer20)

    As medium of literary expression, the common language is inadequate. Like the man of letters, the scientist finds it necessary to "give a purer sense to the words of the tribe", but the purity of scientific language.
    The aim of the scientist is to say only one thing at a time, and to say it unambiguously and with the greatest possible clarity. To achieve this, he simplifies and jargonises. In other words, he uses the vocabulary and syntax of common speech in such a way that each phrase is susceptible to only one interpretation and when the vocabulary and syntax of common speech are too imprecise for his purpose he invites a new technical language, or jargon specially designed to express the limited meaning with which he s professionally concerned.
    The literary artist purifies the language of the tribe in a radically different way. The scientist's aim, as we have seen, is to say one thing, and only one thing at a time. This, most emphatically, is not the aim of the literary artist. Human life is lived simultaneously on many levels and has many meanings. Literature is a device for reporting the multifarious facts and expressing their various significance. When the literary artist undertakes to give a pure sense to the words of his tribe, he does so with the express purpose of creating a language capable of conveying, not the single meaning of some particular science, but the multiple significance of human experience, its most private as well as on its more public levels.
    The word unambiguously (underlined) can best be replaced by:

    A) Vaguely

    B) Dubiously

    C) Explicitly

    D) Amiably

    E) None of these

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Study Package

Questions - Comprehensions Based on General Topics
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