10th Class English Comprehension Question Bank

done Comprehensions Based on General Topics

Question Bank
  • question_answer1)

    Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Soft-bodies animals like caterpillars often fall prey to voracious hunters like birds or reptiles. Despite having no means to 'actively' defend themselves, with weapons like claws or jaws, they have nevertheless evolved other equally effective deterrents. A particular species of the caterpillar lives at an altitude of over 2,500 meters in the Himalayas. It use prominent colours to inform would-be predators of its in-edibility. In the event that an inexperienced or adventurous bird did eat the caterpillar, it would probably vomit it out soon after, and subsequently desist from attacking similar species in the future. Though this would do the unfortunate victim no good, the species benefit, a rare example of the martyr among animals.
    Caterpillars cannot defend themselves because they:
     

    A) are passive animals.

    B) are lazy.

    C) cannot acquire weapons.

    D) have no claws or jaws.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer2)

    Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Soft-bodies animals like caterpillars often fall prey to voracious hunters like birds or reptiles. Despite having no means to 'actively' defend themselves, with weapons like claws or jaws, they have nevertheless evolved other equally effective deterrents. A particular species of the caterpillar lives at an altitude of over 2,500 meters in the Himalayas. It use prominent colours to inform would-be predators of its in-edibility. In the event that an inexperienced or adventurous bird did eat the caterpillar, it would probably vomit it out soon after, and subsequently desist from attacking similar species in the future. Though this would do the unfortunate victim no good, the species benefit, a rare example of the martyr among animals.
    The expression 'other equally effective deterrents' means:
     

    A) preventive weapons which have equal effect on other

    B) mechanism which scares everyone equally well

    C) preventive equipment which is as effective as something that has been already

    D) deterrents that are as powerful as those the caterpillars have

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer3)

    Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Soft-bodies animals like caterpillars often fall prey to voracious hunters like birds or reptiles. Despite having no means to 'actively' defend themselves, with weapons like claws or jaws, they have nevertheless evolved other equally effective deterrents. A particular species of the caterpillar lives at an altitude of over 2,500 meters in the Himalayas. It use prominent colours to inform would-be predators of its in-edibility. In the event that an inexperienced or adventurous bird did eat the caterpillar, it would probably vomit it out soon after, and subsequently desist from attacking similar species in the future. Though this would do the unfortunate victim no good, the species benefit, a rare example of the martyr among animals.
    The Himalayan caterpillar uses prominent colours to:
     

    A) warn the predator.               

    B) attack the predator.

    C) reveal itself.

    D) defend itself.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer4)

    Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Soft-bodies animals like caterpillars often fall prey to voracious hunters like birds or reptiles. Despite having no means to 'actively' defend themselves, with weapons like claws or jaws, they have nevertheless evolved other equally effective deterrents. A particular species of the caterpillar lives at an altitude of over 2,500 meters in the Himalayas. It use prominent colours to inform would-be predators of its in-edibility. In the event that an inexperienced or adventurous bird did eat the caterpillar, it would probably vomit it out soon after, and subsequently desist from attacking similar species in the future. Though this would do the unfortunate victim no good, the species benefit, a rare example of the martyr among animals.
    Experienced birds do not attack the Himalayan caterpillar because they are:
     

    A) Repulsive                     

    B) Inedible

    C) Aggressive                    

    D) Diseased

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer5)

    Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Soft-bodies animals like caterpillars often fall prey to voracious hunters like birds or reptiles. Despite having no means to 'actively' defend themselves, with weapons like claws or jaws, they have nevertheless evolved other equally effective deterrents. A particular species of the caterpillar lives at an altitude of over 2,500 meters in the Himalayas. It use prominent colours to inform would-be predators of its in-edibility. In the event that an inexperienced or adventurous bird did eat the caterpillar, it would probably vomit it out soon after, and subsequently desist from attacking similar species in the future. Though this would do the unfortunate victim no good, the species benefit, a rare example of the martyr among animals.
    In context of the passage, a martyr is one who dies:

    A) without putting up resistance.     

    B) without any gain to oneself.

    C) while defending one's homeland.  

    D) to save others.

    E) None of these

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  • question_answer6)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    What carmakers often mean when they say a car is well-designed is that it appeals to men, particularly to their less noble instinct. "Beautiful body she must move like a dream." But auto-macho is going out of style. In America, 47% of new private cars are bought by women, up from 35% in 1989. Add in the influence women have on a family's car-buying and it is probable that women are more influential overall in choosing cars than men. So, carmakers are learning to create designs that appeal to them.
    Women tend to buy cheaper cars, largely because working women tend to have lower income. In America, they buy 55% of the small cars, 44% of medium sized ones, but only 28% of large and luxurious models. They put more store on reliability than men do, probably a hidden reason for the rise in Japanese imports.
    American carmakers are now tailoring certain versions of their cars with women in mind. And they are learning that design can sway even normally pragmatic women, as a comparison between Ford's Thunderbird and Mercury Cougar demonstrates. The Thunderbird is a high performance car, i.e., it goes fast and is styled to look aggressive. Less than 40% of Thunderbirds are bought by women. But the same car-with a more sedate body, a different name (the Cougar) and different advertising-is as popular with women as it is with men.
    The cars that are most likely to sell would be:
     

    A) Sedate, reliable, less macho       

    B) Reliable, cheaper, less macho

    C) Sedate, cheaper, less macho       

    D) Smooth, sedate, less macho

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer7)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    What carmakers often mean when they say a car is well-designed is that it appeals to men, particularly to their less noble instinct. "Beautiful body she must move like a dream." But auto-macho is going out of style. In America, 47% of new private cars are bought by women, up from 35% in 1989. Add in the influence women have on a family's car-buying and it is probable that women are more influential overall in choosing cars than men. So, carmakers are learning to create designs that appeal to them.
    Women tend to buy cheaper cars, largely because working women tend to have lower income. In America, they buy 55% of the small cars, 44% of medium sized ones, but only 28% of large and luxurious models. They put more store on reliability than men do, probably a hidden reason for the rise in Japanese imports.
    American carmakers are now tailoring certain versions of their cars with women in mind. And they are learning that design can sway even normally pragmatic women, as a comparison between Ford's Thunderbird and Mercury Cougar demonstrates. The Thunderbird is a high performance car, i.e., it goes fast and is styled to look aggressive. Less than 40% of Thunderbirds are bought by women. But the same car-with a more sedate body, a different name (the Cougar) and different advertising-is as popular with women as it is with men.
    Which of the following can be inferred from the passage?
     

    A) Sedate cars with different advertising register more sales.

    B) Small cars are gaining sales.

    C) Medium cars are gaining sales.

    D) Luxurious cars are not selling at all.

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer8)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    What carmakers often mean when they say a car is well-designed is that it appeals to men, particularly to their less noble instinct. "Beautiful body she must move like a dream." But auto-macho is going out of style. In America, 47% of new private cars are bought by women, up from 35% in 1989. Add in the influence women have on a family's car-buying and it is probable that women are more influential overall in choosing cars than men. So, carmakers are learning to create designs that appeal to them.
    Women tend to buy cheaper cars, largely because working women tend to have lower income. In America, they buy 55% of the small cars, 44% of medium sized ones, but only 28% of large and luxurious models. They put more store on reliability than men do, probably a hidden reason for the rise in Japanese imports.
    American carmakers are now tailoring certain versions of their cars with women in mind. And they are learning that design can sway even normally pragmatic women, as a comparison between Ford's Thunderbird and Mercury Cougar demonstrates. The Thunderbird is a high performance car, i.e., it goes fast and is styled to look aggressive. Less than 40% of Thunderbirds are bought by women. But the same car-with a more sedate body, a different name (the Cougar) and different advertising-is as popular with women as it is with men.
    Suppose VX 1000 is a new car that is taking away customers from Japanese cars. Our close at hypothesis would be that VX 1000:
     

    A) must be less macho.             

    B) might be cheaper.

    C) might be better advertised.       

    D) might be more reliable.

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer9)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    What carmakers often mean when they say a car is well-designed is that it appeals to men, particularly to their less noble instinct. "Beautiful body she must move like a dream." But auto-macho is going out of style. In America, 47% of new private cars are bought by women, up from 35% in 1989. Add in the influence women have on a family's car-buying and it is probable that women are more influential overall in choosing cars than men. So, carmakers are learning to create designs that appeal to them.
    Women tend to buy cheaper cars, largely because working women tend to have lower income. In America, they buy 55% of the small cars, 44% of medium sized ones, but only 28% of large and luxurious models. They put more store on reliability than men do, probably a hidden reason for the rise in Japanese imports.
    American carmakers are now tailoring certain versions of their cars with women in mind. And they are learning that design can sway even normally pragmatic women, as a comparison between Ford's Thunderbird and Mercury Cougar demonstrates. The Thunderbird is a high performance car, i.e., it goes fast and is styled to look aggressive. Less than 40% of Thunderbirds are bought by women. But the same car-with a more sedate body, a different name (the Cougar) and different advertising-is as popular with women as it is with men.
    Which of the following statements is false?
     

    A) Auto macho is passe.

    B) High performance cars are losing out among woman.

    C) Japanese cars are considered more reliable.

    D) Japanese imports are rising.

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer10)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    What carmakers often mean when they say a car is well-designed is that it appeals to men, particularly to their less noble instinct. "Beautiful body she must move like a dream." But auto-macho is going out of style. In America, 47% of new private cars are bought by women, up from 35% in 1989. Add in the influence women have on a family's car-buying and it is probable that women are more influential overall in choosing cars than men. So, carmakers are learning to create designs that appeal to them.
    Women tend to buy cheaper cars, largely because working women tend to have lower income. In America, they buy 55% of the small cars, 44% of medium sized ones, but only 28% of large and luxurious models. They put more store on reliability than men do, probably a hidden reason for the rise in Japanese imports.
    American carmakers are now tailoring certain versions of their cars with women in mind. And they are learning that design can sway even normally pragmatic women, as a comparison between Ford's Thunderbird and Mercury Cougar demonstrates. The Thunderbird is a high performance car, i.e., it goes fast and is styled to look aggressive. Less than 40% of Thunderbirds are bought by women. But the same car-with a more sedate body, a different name (the Cougar) and different advertising-is as popular with women as it is with men.
    Which of the following statements is true?
     

    A) American working women earn as much as men.

    B) Women as buyers are not as pragmatic as men.

    C) Thunderbird and Mercury are differently designed.

    D) Women always buy car with a sedate body.

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer11)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Every survey ever held has shown that the image of an attractive woman is the most effective advertising gimmick. She may sit astride the mudguard of a new car, or step into it ablaze with jewels, she may lie at the man's feet stroking his new socks, she may hold the petrol pump in a challenging pass, or dance through woodland glades in slow motion in all the glory of new shampoo, whatever she does her image sells. The gyneolatry of our civilization is written large upon its face, upon hoardings, cinema screens, television, newspapers, magazines, tins, packets, cartons, bottles, all consecrated to the reigning deity, the female fetish. Her dominion must not be thought to entail the rule of women, for she is not a woman. Her glossy lips and matt complexion, her unfocused eyes and flawless fingers, her extraordinary hair all floating and shining, curling and gleaming, reveal the inhuman triumph of cosmetics, lighting focusing and printing. She sleeps unruffled, her lips red and juicy and closed, her eyes as crisp and black as if newly painted, and her false lashes immaculately curled. Even when she washes her face with a newly and creamier toilet soap her expression is as tranquil and vacant and her paint as flawless as ever. If ever she should appear tousled and troubled, her features are miraculously smoothed to their proper veneer by a new washing powder on a bouillon cube. For she is a doll: weeping, pouting or sinking, running or reclaiming, she is a doll.
    What point is the writer trying to make when he says "She may lie at a man's feet stroking his new socks?"
     

    A) Women like being subservient.

    B) Women are observed with clothes.

    C) This is a typical posture of women in advertising.

    D) Women enjoy this kind of intimacy.

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer12)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Every survey ever held has shown that the image of an attractive woman is the most effective advertising gimmick. She may sit astride the mudguard of a new car, or step into it ablaze with jewels, she may lie at the man's feet stroking his new socks, she may hold the petrol pump in a challenging pass, or dance through woodland glades in slow motion in all the glory of new shampoo, whatever she does her image sells. The gyneolatry of our civilization is written large upon its face, upon hoardings, cinema screens, television, newspapers, magazines, tins, packets, cartons, bottles, all consecrated to the reigning deity, the female fetish. Her dominion must not be thought to entail the rule of women, for she is not a woman. Her glossy lips and matt complexion, her unfocused eyes and flawless fingers, her extraordinary hair all floating and shining, curling and gleaming, reveal the inhuman triumph of cosmetics, lighting focusing and printing. She sleeps unruffled, her lips red and juicy and closed, her eyes as crisp and black as if newly painted, and her false lashes immaculately curled. Even when she washes her face with a newly and creamier toilet soap her expression is as tranquil and vacant and her paint as flawless as ever. If ever she should appear tousled and troubled, her features are miraculously smoothed to their proper veneer by a new washing powder on a bouillon cube. For she is a doll: weeping, pouting or sinking, running or reclaiming, she is a doll.
    The 'gyneolatry' of one civilization would suggest all the following except that:
     

    A) women enjoy immense power in modern society

    B) the image of women boost sales as few other things can.

    C) women worship is all pervasive in advertising.

    D) glamorous and attractive women rare the forte of modern advertising.

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer13)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Every survey ever held has shown that the image of an attractive woman is the most effective advertising gimmick. She may sit astride the mudguard of a new car, or step into it ablaze with jewels, she may lie at the man's feet stroking his new socks, she may hold the petrol pump in a challenging pass, or dance through woodland glades in slow motion in all the glory of new shampoo, whatever she does her image sells. The gyneolatry of our civilization is written large upon its face, upon hoardings, cinema screens, television, newspapers, magazines, tins, packets, cartons, bottles, all consecrated to the reigning deity, the female fetish. Her dominion must not be thought to entail the rule of women, for she is not a woman. Her glossy lips and matt complexion, her unfocused eyes and flawless fingers, her extraordinary hair all floating and shining, curling and gleaming, reveal the inhuman triumph of cosmetics, lighting focusing and printing. She sleeps unruffled, her lips red and juicy and closed, her eyes as crisp and black as if newly painted, and her false lashes immaculately curled. Even when she washes her face with a newly and creamier toilet soap her expression is as tranquil and vacant and her paint as flawless as ever. If ever she should appear tousled and troubled, her features are miraculously smoothed to their proper veneer by a new washing powder on a bouillon cube. For she is a doll: weeping, pouting or sinking, running or reclaiming, she is a doll.
    By saying that woman depicted in an advertisement is "not a woman" the author implies that:
     

    A) in real life women are less attractive.

    B) the depiction of women in advertisement is grossly artificial and unreal.

    C) in real life women are more dominant.

    D) in advertisement, a woman is a mere commercial symbol.

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer14)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Every survey ever held has shown that the image of an attractive woman is the most effective advertising gimmick. She may sit astride the mudguard of a new car, or step into it ablaze with jewels, she may lie at the man's feet stroking his new socks, she may hold the petrol pump in a challenging pass, or dance through woodland glades in slow motion in all the glory of new shampoo, whatever she does her image sells. The gyneolatry of our civilization is written large upon its face, upon hoardings, cinema screens, television, newspapers, magazines, tins, packets, cartons, bottles, all consecrated to the reigning deity, the female fetish. Her dominion must not be thought to entail the rule of women, for she is not a woman. Her glossy lips and matt complexion, her unfocused eyes and flawless fingers, her extraordinary hair all floating and shining, curling and gleaming, reveal the inhuman triumph of cosmetics, lighting focusing and printing. She sleeps unruffled, her lips red and juicy and closed, her eyes as crisp and black as if newly painted, and her false lashes immaculately curled. Even when she washes her face with a newly and creamier toilet soap her expression is as tranquil and vacant and her paint as flawless as ever. If ever she should appear tousled and troubled, her features are miraculously smoothed to their proper veneer by a new washing powder on a bouillon cube. For she is a doll: weeping, pouting or sinking, running or reclaiming, she is a doll.
    The author's primary purpose in this passage is:
     

    A) to ridicule women.

    B) to show the dominance of women in advertising.

    C) to portray the obsession of women with trivial things.

    D) to depict the emancipation of women.

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer15)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Every survey ever held has shown that the image of an attractive woman is the most effective advertising gimmick. She may sit astride the mudguard of a new car, or step into it ablaze with jewels, she may lie at the man's feet stroking his new socks, she may hold the petrol pump in a challenging pass, or dance through woodland glades in slow motion in all the glory of new shampoo, whatever she does her image sells. The gyneolatry of our civilization is written large upon its face, upon hoardings, cinema screens, television, newspapers, magazines, tins, packets, cartons, bottles, all consecrated to the reigning deity, the female fetish. Her dominion must not be thought to entail the rule of women, for she is not a woman. Her glossy lips and matt complexion, her unfocused eyes and flawless fingers, her extraordinary hair all floating and shining, curling and gleaming, reveal the inhuman triumph of cosmetics, lighting focusing and printing. She sleeps unruffled, her lips red and juicy and closed, her eyes as crisp and black as if newly painted, and her false lashes immaculately curled. Even when she washes her face with a newly and creamier toilet soap her expression is as tranquil and vacant and her paint as flawless as ever. If ever she should appear tousled and troubled, her features are miraculously smoothed to their proper veneer by a new washing powder on a bouillon cube. For she is a doll: weeping, pouting or sinking, running or reclaiming, she is a doll.
    In the last sentence of the paragraph, the word 'doll' is meant to express:
     

    A) Tenderness                   

    B) Delicacy

    C) Contempt                    

    D) Beauty

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer16)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Alzheimer's disease impairs a person's ability to recall memories, both distant and as recent as a few hours before. Although there is no cure yet for the illness, there may be hope for a cure with a protein called nerve growth factor. The protein is produced by nerve cells in the same region of the brain where Alzheimer's occurs. Based on this relationship, scientists from the University of Lund in Sweden and the University of California at San Diego designed an experiment to test whether doses of nerve growth factors could service the effects of memory loss caused by Alzheimer's. Using a group of rats with impaired memory, the scientist gave half of the rats dose of nerve growth factor while giving the other half a blood protein as a placebo, thus, creating a control group. At the end of the four-week test, the rate given the nerve growth factor performed equally to rats with normal memory abilities. While experiments do not show that nerve growth factor can stop the general process of deterioration caused by Alzheimer’s, they do show potential as a means to slowing the process significantly.
    This passage is mainly concerned with:
     

    A) cures for Alzheimer's disease.

    B) impaired memory of patients.

    C) the use of rats as experimental subjects.

    D) nerve growth factor as a cure for Alzheimer's.

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer17)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Alzheimer's disease impairs a person's ability to recall memories, both distant and as recent as a few hours before. Although there is no cure yet for the illness, there may be hope for a cure with a protein called nerve growth factor. The protein is produced by nerve cells in the same region of the brain where Alzheimer's occurs. Based on this relationship, scientists from the University of Lund in Sweden and the University of California at San Diego designed an experiment to test whether doses of nerve growth factors could service the effects of memory loss caused by Alzheimer's. Using a group of rats with impaired memory, the scientist gave half of the rats dose of nerve growth factor while giving the other half a blood protein as a placebo, thus, creating a control group. At the end of the four-week test, the rate given the nerve growth factor performed equally to rats with normal memory abilities. While experiments do not show that nerve growth factor can stop the general process of deterioration caused by Alzheimer’s, they do show potential as a means to slowing the process significantly.
    According to the passage, where is nerve growth factor produced in the body?
     

    A) In the pituitary gland

    B) In nerve cells of the brain

    C) In red blood cells in the circulatory system

    D) In nerve cells in the special column

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer18)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Alzheimer's disease impairs a person's ability to recall memories, both distant and as recent as a few hours before. Although there is no cure yet for the illness, there may be hope for a cure with a protein called nerve growth factor. The protein is produced by nerve cells in the same region of the brain where Alzheimer's occurs. Based on this relationship, scientists from the University of Lund in Sweden and the University of California at San Diego designed an experiment to test whether doses of nerve growth factors could service the effects of memory loss caused by Alzheimer's. Using a group of rats with impaired memory, the scientist gave half of the rats dose of nerve growth factor while giving the other half a blood protein as a placebo, thus, creating a control group. At the end of the four-week test, the rate given the nerve growth factor performed equally to rats with normal memory abilities. While experiments do not show that nerve growth factor can stop the general process of deterioration caused by Alzheimer’s, they do show potential as a means to slowing the process significantly.
    The word 'impairs' is most similar to which of the following?
     

    A) Affects                         

    B) Destroys

    C) Enhances                     

    D) Diminishes

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer19)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Alzheimer's disease impairs a person's ability to recall memories, both distant and as recent as a few hours before. Although there is no cure yet for the illness, there may be hope for a cure with a protein called nerve growth factor. The protein is produced by nerve cells in the same region of the brain where Alzheimer's occurs. Based on this relationship, scientists from the University of Lund in Sweden and the University of California at San Diego designed an experiment to test whether doses of nerve growth factors could service the effects of memory loss caused by Alzheimer's. Using a group of rats with impaired memory, the scientist gave half of the rats dose of nerve growth factor while giving the other half a blood protein as a placebo, thus, creating a control group. At the end of the four-week test, the rate given the nerve growth factor performed equally to rats with normal memory abilities. While experiments do not show that nerve growth factor can stop the general process of deterioration caused by Alzheimer’s, they do show potential as a means to slowing the process significantly.
    Which of the following can be inferred from the passage?
     

    A) Alzheimer's disease is deadly

    B) Though unsuccessful, the experiments did show some benefits derived from the nerve growth factor.

    C) The experiment did not show any significant benefits from nerve growth factor.

    D) More work needs to be done to understand the effects of nerve growth centre.

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer20)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Alzheimer's disease impairs a person's ability to recall memories, both distant and as recent as a few hours before. Although there is no cure yet for the illness, there may be hope for a cure with a protein called nerve growth factor. The protein is produced by nerve cells in the same region of the brain where Alzheimer's occurs. Based on this relationship, scientists from the University of Lund in Sweden and the University of California at San Diego designed an experiment to test whether doses of nerve growth factors could service the effects of memory loss caused by Alzheimer's. Using a group of rats with impaired memory, the scientist gave half of the rats dose of nerve growth factor while giving the other half a blood protein as a placebo, thus, creating a control group. At the end of the four-week test, the rate given the nerve growth factor performed equally to rats with normal memory abilities. While experiments do not show that nerve growth factor can stop the general process of deterioration caused by Alzheimer’s, they do show potential as a means to slowing the process significantly.
    The passage most closely resembles which of the following patterns of organization?
     

    A) Chronological                   

    B) Statement and illustration

    C) Alphabetical order               

    D) All of these

    E) None of the above

    View Solution play_arrow
  • question_answer21)

    Direction: Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions that follow:
    Alzheimer's disease impairs a person's ability to recall memories, both distant and as recent as a few hours before. Although there is no cure yet for the illness, there may be hope for a cure with a protein called nerve growth factor. The protein is produced by nerve cells in the same region of the brain where Alzheimer's occurs. Based on this relationship, scientists from the University of Lund in Sweden and the University of California at San Diego designed an experiment to test whether doses of nerve growth factors could service the effects of memory loss caused by Alzheimer's. Using a group of rats with impaired memory, the scientist gave half of the rats dose of nerve growth factor while giving the other half a blood protein as a placebo, thus, creating a control group. At the end of the four-week test, the rate given the nerve growth factor performed equally to rats with normal memory abilities. While experiments do not show that nerve growth factor can stop the general process of deterioration caused by Alzheimer’s, they do show potential as a means to slowing the process significantly.
    Which of the following is closest in meaning to the word 'deterioration'?

    A) Depression                   

    B) Deduction

    C) Decline                        

    D) Disconnection

    E) None of these

    View Solution play_arrow

Study Package

Questions - Comprehensions Based on General Topics
  15 10



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