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  • Diesel Engine


    Thu, October 23rd 2014

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    "The fact that fat oils from vegetable sources can be used may seem insignificant today..." Rudolf Diesel, 1912 While it can be safely asserted that the Diesel engine was, indeed, invented by Paris-born inventor Rudolf Diesel (1858-1913), it is not the case that we can attribute to him the very first "diesel" engine. "Diesel engine" has for some time been the generic term used to describe any cMore.

  • Coaxial Cable


    Mon, October 20th 2014

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    "AT&T is proud to follow in the footsteps of Espenschied and Affel as we continue to drive innovation." Dave Belanger, chief scientist at AT&T Labs In the early 1920s it was clear to communications engineers that high-frequency transmission lines were paramountto the success of any further developments in communications, since ordinary wires and cables simply could not cope. Two engiMore.

  • Kraft Process


    Mon, October 20th 2014

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    "My head is full of [ideas] ...but they serve no purpose thereby must be put down on papery Camilo Jose Cela, writer The first modern paper was invented in 105 C.E. by a Chinese court official called Ts'ai Lun. He made sheets out of mulberry bark, rags, and hemp waste mixed with water. Paper continued to be made primarily of rags until the early nineteenth century, when mechanized papermakinMore.

  • Automatic Transmission


    Sun, October 19th 2014

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    The Sturtevant family business was founded in 1883 by Thomas L. Sturtevant, with the aim of satisfying the increasing need for mechanization in the fertilizer industry. Thoms's son Lawrence, and his nephew Thomas J. Sturtevant, came to work for him—Thomas bringing with him a degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Sturtevant soon branched out into the automotive field and desiMore.

  • Phonograph


    Mon, October 13th 2014

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    "If we did all the things we are capable of, we would literally astound ourselves." Thomas Alva Edison On November 21, 1877, Thomas Alva Edison (1847- 1931) announced the invention of the first device for recording and replaying sound—the "phonograph." Like the development of photography, it was a landmark invention that allowed for moments or periods in time to be captured in perpetuity. More.

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